2013
DOI: 10.1016/j.jsv.2013.01.024
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

An investigation into the acceleration response of a damaged beam-type structure to a moving force

Abstract: Publication information Journal of Sound and Vibration, 332 (13): 3201-3217Publisher Elsevier Item record/more information http://hdl.handle.net/10197/6212 Publisher's statementThis is the author's version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Sound and Vibration. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work s… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

3
47
0

Year Published

2013
2013
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
5
1
1

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 55 publications
(50 citation statements)
references
References 33 publications
3
47
0
Order By: Relevance
“…The consideration of a road profile in a sprung vehicle model renders a significantly rougher mid-span acceleration than found with constant loads. Similar to the approach in [4], the first step toward trying to expose the 'static' and 'damage' components is to use a MAF to remove the main frequency of vibration of the bridge from the signal shown in Fig. 4(b).…”
Section: Use Of Area Ratios For Locating and Quantifying Damagementioning
confidence: 99%
See 3 more Smart Citations
“…The consideration of a road profile in a sprung vehicle model renders a significantly rougher mid-span acceleration than found with constant loads. Similar to the approach in [4], the first step toward trying to expose the 'static' and 'damage' components is to use a MAF to remove the main frequency of vibration of the bridge from the signal shown in Fig. 4(b).…”
Section: Use Of Area Ratios For Locating and Quantifying Damagementioning
confidence: 99%
“…When the vehicle was travelling on a smooth profile [4], once the main bridge frequency was removed, typically all that remained were the 'static' and 'damage' components, but this time, there is a periodic vibration left that obscures any damage features that may be present. If a Fourier transform is carried out on the 'filt 1' signal, the dominant frequency is found to be 1.4 Hz, which corresponds to the bounce frequency of the vehicle.…”
Section: Fig 5 -Filtering Of Unwanted Bridge and Vehicle Frequenciesmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…The model used in this study is similar to the model used in [16,21,32,33] and is intended to be representative of the kind of 2 axle trucks present in modern traffic fleets (i.e. it is not a special test vehicle).…”
Section: Vehicle Bridge Interaction (Vbi)mentioning
confidence: 99%