2018
DOI: 10.1186/s12967-018-1615-3
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Acute effects of different resistance training loads on cardiac autonomic modulation in hypertensive postmenopausal women

Abstract: BackgroundIndividuals with arterial hypertension often have an autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance with predominance of sympathetic ANS. This predominance can lead to injury of several organs affecting its functioning. There is evidence that performing high intensity resistance training (RT) with heavier loads and a lower number of repetitions results in lower cardiovascular stress when compared with lighter loads and a higher number of repetitions. However, the effects of different protocols of RT in aut… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(28 citation statements)
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References 44 publications
(43 reference statements)
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“…Therefore, it might be interesting to avoid such responses in COVID-19 survivors under rehabilitation. According to previous studies, RT protocols with a few number of repetitions (≤6 repetitions) and long between-sets rest intervals (≥3 min) result in less pronounced increases in sympathetic activity, cortisol, and lactate levels ( Kraemer et al, 1990 ; Smilios et al, 2003 , 2007 ; Vale et al, 2018 ). Moreover, low-volume RT with few repetitions is less glycolytic ( Knuiman et al, 2015 ).…”
Section: Immune Systemmentioning
confidence: 90%
“…Therefore, it might be interesting to avoid such responses in COVID-19 survivors under rehabilitation. According to previous studies, RT protocols with a few number of repetitions (≤6 repetitions) and long between-sets rest intervals (≥3 min) result in less pronounced increases in sympathetic activity, cortisol, and lactate levels ( Kraemer et al, 1990 ; Smilios et al, 2003 , 2007 ; Vale et al, 2018 ). Moreover, low-volume RT with few repetitions is less glycolytic ( Knuiman et al, 2015 ).…”
Section: Immune Systemmentioning
confidence: 90%
“…Nevertheless, several studies already observed that higher volumes do not provide additional strength gains than lower volumes in older adults [ 5 , 12 , 14 , 15 , 16 ]. It is also important to note that when older adults perform a high number of repetitions per set closely to concentric failure, there is a higher acute cardiovascular, metabolic, and neuromuscular stress than for a low volume, which might be harmful in this population [ 17 , 18 , 19 ]. Therefore, considering that no consensus exists regarding the optimal training volume in older adults, alternative approaches must be evaluated.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…22,23 The choice of small number of repetitions (<10) was for safety reasons, since it promotes lower acute increases in blood pressure, HR, double product, [24][25][26] and promotes better autonomic modulation than performing a higher number of repetitions. 27 Resistance training sessions were composed of four multi-joint exercises, with two sets for each exercise, two minutes interval between sets and a speed of two seconds in both eccentric and concentric phase. Multi-joint exercises were selected due to the evidence that they are more efficient in improving general physical fitness, maximal oxygen uptake and muscular strength than single joint exercises, 18 and there is also evidence that the addition of single joints exercises to a multi-joint exercise program does not lead to morphological or functional benefits.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%