1976
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.112.6.853
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Abstract: Acquired cutis laxa, or generalized elastolysis, is a rare disease. One patient was found to have not only cutis laxa but also multiple myeloma.

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Cited by 14 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…[5][6][7] At least 10 patients have been described in the literature as having ACL associated with multiple myeloma ( Table 1). [8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16] Our patient's cutaneous laxity distribution is consistent with descriptions of prior cases. In contrast to prior reports, this is the first case, to our knowledge, of ACL due to myeloma associated with the clinical presentation of GAlike plaques.…”
Section: Commentsupporting
confidence: 84%
“…[5][6][7] At least 10 patients have been described in the literature as having ACL associated with multiple myeloma ( Table 1). [8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16] Our patient's cutaneous laxity distribution is consistent with descriptions of prior cases. In contrast to prior reports, this is the first case, to our knowledge, of ACL due to myeloma associated with the clinical presentation of GAlike plaques.…”
Section: Commentsupporting
confidence: 84%
“…In an earlier report of acral localized acquired cutis laxa, 3 similar clinical features were described, but the histological examination for amyloid was not described. Other reports of acquired cutis laxa in association with myeloma‐associated systemic amyloidosis (four cases) have described generalized, rather than localized, changes 4–7 …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…Most of the cases reported in the literature refer to the generalized form or type I, which may develop in adulthood, usually following episodes of inflammatory dermatoses, hypersensitivity reaction to insect bites or drugs, neoplastic disorders or in association with particular diseases (Table 1). 1–3,7–19 The skin progressively becomes inelastic and redundant, hanging in loose, pendulous folds. The eyelids drop, and face and neck wrinkles give the patients a senile appearance 2,5,7 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%