2010
DOI: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.10.075
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A low intake of antioxidant nutrients is associated with poor semen quality in patients attending fertility clinics

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Cited by 164 publications
(75 citation statements)
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“…In an observational study of 250 men undergoing ICSI, sperm motility was positively influenced by consumption of fruits and cereals (Braga et al, 2012). Furthermore, several observational and experimental studies have shown that higher antioxidant intake (such as vitamin E, vitamin C and b-carotene) which is found in fruits and vegetables was associated with improved sperm motility (and other semen parameters such as sperm counts and morphology), in both fertile and infertile men (Keskes-Ammar et al, 2003;Eskenazi et al, 2005;Akmal et al, 2006;Mendiola et al, 2010). A recent systematic review of 17 randomized trials of antioxidant supplementation showed that most trials reported an improvement in sperm motility with antioxidants compared with placebo (Ross et al, 2010).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In an observational study of 250 men undergoing ICSI, sperm motility was positively influenced by consumption of fruits and cereals (Braga et al, 2012). Furthermore, several observational and experimental studies have shown that higher antioxidant intake (such as vitamin E, vitamin C and b-carotene) which is found in fruits and vegetables was associated with improved sperm motility (and other semen parameters such as sperm counts and morphology), in both fertile and infertile men (Keskes-Ammar et al, 2003;Eskenazi et al, 2005;Akmal et al, 2006;Mendiola et al, 2010). A recent systematic review of 17 randomized trials of antioxidant supplementation showed that most trials reported an improvement in sperm motility with antioxidants compared with placebo (Ross et al, 2010).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Many studies have been carried out on carotenoids, considered an important group of natural antioxidants (Bast et al, 1998;Møller et al, 2000;Schabath et al, 2004;Rao and Rao, 2007). In the last decade, lycopene, a carotenoid present in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) and several ripe fruits and vegetables, such as watermelon, pink grapefruit and carrots (Nguyen and Schwartz, 1999;Perkins-Veazie et al, 2003;Tadmor et al, 2005), has been considered in some studies related with human and animal health (Bhuvaneswari and Nagini, 2005;Rao et al, 2006;Avci and Durak, 2007;Bhom, 2007) and reproductive physiology (Martino et al, 2006;Goyal et al, 2007;Mangiagalli et al, 2007;Turk et al, 2007;Mendiola et al, 2010). In rooster, in particular, Mangiagalli et al (2010) found positive effects of lycopene addition on fertility and qualitative characteristics of semen.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…2 One of the reasons for the impaired semen parameters over the years is dietary factors. 3,4 The significant effects of dietary fatty acids (FAs) on male fertility have been well documented both in animal and human studies. 5,6 There are three types of natural FAs: saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%