2018
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101574
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Abstract: Both loss of muscle mass and strength are important sarcopenia-related traits. In this study, we investigated both specific and shared serum metabolites associated with these two traits in 136 Caucasian women using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. A joint analysis of multivariate traits was used to examine the associations of individual metabolites with muscle mass measured by the body mass index-adjusted appendicular lean mass (ALM/BMI) and muscle strength measured by hand grip strength (HGS)… Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(19 citation statements)
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References 41 publications
(44 reference statements)
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“…Of interest, a lot of circulating metabolites that are different in RA patients compared to controls could be related to associated metabolic syndrome, since choline metabolism (especially TMAO and carnitine), aminoacids (alanine, glutamine, glutamate, arginine, aspartate, asparagine, histidine, methionine, cysteine, lysine, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), phenylaniline, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and phospholipids (phosphatydilcholines) also change in those with metabolic syndrome [80]. Several works on muscle mass have also suggested that some circulating metabolites can be biomarkers of muscle mass and sarcopenia [81]. Even though both fat tissue and muscle, as well as associated immune cells in these inflamed tissues, can be sources of metabolites, it is unknown how much they can contribute to the pool of circulating metabolites.…”
Section: Comorbiditiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Of interest, a lot of circulating metabolites that are different in RA patients compared to controls could be related to associated metabolic syndrome, since choline metabolism (especially TMAO and carnitine), aminoacids (alanine, glutamine, glutamate, arginine, aspartate, asparagine, histidine, methionine, cysteine, lysine, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), phenylaniline, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and phospholipids (phosphatydilcholines) also change in those with metabolic syndrome [80]. Several works on muscle mass have also suggested that some circulating metabolites can be biomarkers of muscle mass and sarcopenia [81]. Even though both fat tissue and muscle, as well as associated immune cells in these inflamed tissues, can be sources of metabolites, it is unknown how much they can contribute to the pool of circulating metabolites.…”
Section: Comorbiditiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A total of 119 unrelated Caucasian females, aged 20-40 years, were recruited through Louisiana Osteoporosis Study (LOS) (Du et al, 2017, Zhao et al, 2018, a repertoire of more than 16,000 subjects (by the end of August 2019) collected for genomic, transcriptomic, methylomic, metabolomic, and metagenomic studies of complex diseases/traits, particularly for osteoporosis. All the subjects were living in New Orleans, Louisiana and its surrounding areas and were self-identified as being of European origin.…”
Section: Subjectsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The LC-MS based metabolomics platform developed by Dr. Garrett's lab in the Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics at University of Florida was used to perform the metabolomic analysis. The detailed experimental procedures have been previously described (Liu et al, 2017, Zhao et al, 2018.…”
Section: Acknowledgmentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Lysine, one of the essential amino acids, is also found in great quantities in muscles, and is associated with muscle mass [66]. In a metabolomic analysis, it was found that serum pipecolic acid, a lysine metabolite, was positively associated with muscle mass and muscle strength, but negatively associated with age in Caucasian women.…”
Section: Lysine and Pipecolic Acidmentioning
confidence: 99%