2021
DOI: 10.2478/aoas-2020-0115
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Abstract: The aim of the study was to compare morphometric indices and the mineralization level of humerus, femur and tibia in Leghorn (H-22), Sussex (S-66) and Rhode Island Red (R-11) hens at different age (weeks 6., 16., 45. and 64.), as well as some blood parameters. The material for the experiment was one-day old chicks of breeds: Leghorn (H-22), Sussex (S-66) and Rhode Island Red –RIR (R-11), which were separated into three groups. At 6, 16, 45 and 64 weeks of the study, 10 birds selected from each group were weigh… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…This once again confirms the anti-osteoporotic action of xylanase. Enzyme inclusion also increased the Ca:P ratio, but all obtained values were within the normal range of values reported for layers at this age [60]. Similar to the improvements in eggshell mineralization, the increased bone mineral content observed in the current study may be due to improved absorption of minerals from the intestine, as a result of the lowered chyme viscosity after xylanase supplementation [48].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 84%
“…This once again confirms the anti-osteoporotic action of xylanase. Enzyme inclusion also increased the Ca:P ratio, but all obtained values were within the normal range of values reported for layers at this age [60]. Similar to the improvements in eggshell mineralization, the increased bone mineral content observed in the current study may be due to improved absorption of minerals from the intestine, as a result of the lowered chyme viscosity after xylanase supplementation [48].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 84%
“…As observed at 70 WOA ( Muir et al, 2022b ) and by Skomorucha and Sosnowka-Czajka (2021) , at 90 WOA femur weight, and femur weight to length ratio, as an assessment of bone density, were higher in HW compared to LW hens. Concurrently the femur bone of HW hens was also longer and wider than in LW hens, with similar trends observed in the tibia by Kolakshyapati et al (2019) .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 54%
“…Pigs, like many other livestock intended for extensive production systems, are genetically selected to achieve greater weight gain; however, some species are predisposed to bone development disorders, especially under commercially intensive production systems [ 44 ]. The bone is a dynamic organ and undergoes two processes, synthesis and resorption, that are kept in balance to maintain normal bone mass necessary for movement and body support, protection of vital organs and general mineral management in the living organism [ 23 , 45 ]. Leg fractures, deformities and bone weakness impair pig welfare and behaviour and are important contributors to economic losses in terms of reduced daily gains and carcass quality [ 17 , 46 , 47 , 48 , 49 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Prior to the analysis, bones were thawed at room temperature for 6 h. Bone density was assessed by determining whole bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) using the DXA method (Norland XR 43 densitometer, Norland, Fort Atkinson, WI, USA) and calculating the Seedor index by dividing the weight of the left femur by its length [ 23 ]. To evaluate the mechanical properties of bone mid-diaphysis, a 3-point bending test was performed using a universal testing machine (Zwick Z010, Zwick, Ulm, Germany).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%