Lexikologie 2001
DOI: 10.1515/9783110171471.2.38.1722
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Word recognition and lexical access: Connectionist approaches

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Cited by 14 publications
(18 citation statements)
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“…Essentially, previous masked priming studies using both translation equivalents and interlingual homophones as stimuli have uniformly indicated that crosslinguistic phonological similarity facilitates the processing of targets. In terms of theory, those phonological-based faciliatory effects are interpreted as implying that phonological information is stored in an integrated manner in the bilingual lexicon and, as a result, the representations of words in the two languages can activate one another (e.g., Dijkstra, 2005).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Essentially, previous masked priming studies using both translation equivalents and interlingual homophones as stimuli have uniformly indicated that crosslinguistic phonological similarity facilitates the processing of targets. In terms of theory, those phonological-based faciliatory effects are interpreted as implying that phonological information is stored in an integrated manner in the bilingual lexicon and, as a result, the representations of words in the two languages can activate one another (e.g., Dijkstra, 2005).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Lexical data, such as phonological, orthographic, and semantic representations, are retrieved using the mental lexicon (Dijkstra, 2005). Assuming concurrent coactivation of L1 and L2, research on bilingual lexical processing has shown that those retrieval mechanisms are language nonselective (Kroll et al, 2014).…”
Section: Combined Analysismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the light of this observation, one may wonder to what extent the recognition of COGNATES is influenced by lateral inhibition between their two readings. In particular, the widely replicated cognate facilitation effect indicates that any decelerating processing consequences of lateral inhibition between the two orthographic readings of a cognate are usually more than compensated for by the facilitatory resonance between orthographic and semantic codes (Dijkstra, 2005).…”
Section: Processing Neighbours (Orthographically Overlapping Words Wi...mentioning
confidence: 99%