2023
DOI: 10.1111/syen.12617
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When a key innovation becomes redundant: Patterns, drivers and consequences of elytral reduction in Coleoptera

Jakub Goczał,
Rolf G. Beutel,
Matthew L. Gimmel
et al.

Abstract: The transformation of the fore wings into strongly sclerotized protective covers (elytra) is considered a fundamental evolutionary innovation of the megadiverse order Coleoptera. Surprisingly, these multifunctional structures have been reduced in many distantly related groups of beetles. Patterns, drivers and the evolutionary implications of this modification have never been comprehensively discussed. In the present study, we surveyed the entire order Coleoptera to analyse the patterns of elytral shortening an… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 165 publications
(303 reference statements)
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“…Densely tuberculate and incompletely sclerotized elytra with thin window punctures, today only preserved in the archostematan families Cupedidae (36 described extant species; Goczał et al, 2024) and Ommatidae (six described extant species; Goczał et al, 2024), indeed belong to the groundplan of Coleoptera in the broadest sense (e.g., Friedrich et al, 2009). This is indicated by the presence of this condition in †Tshekardocoleidae, †Permocupedidae and other extinct groups (Figure 3a-c; Boudinot et al, 2023;Ponomarenko, 1969).…”
Section: Metacoleopteramentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Densely tuberculate and incompletely sclerotized elytra with thin window punctures, today only preserved in the archostematan families Cupedidae (36 described extant species; Goczał et al, 2024) and Ommatidae (six described extant species; Goczał et al, 2024), indeed belong to the groundplan of Coleoptera in the broadest sense (e.g., Friedrich et al, 2009). This is indicated by the presence of this condition in †Tshekardocoleidae, †Permocupedidae and other extinct groups (Figure 3a-c; Boudinot et al, 2023;Ponomarenko, 1969).…”
Section: Metacoleopteramentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Species of †Ochthebiites Ponomarenko, possibly belonging to Hydraenidae, are known from Karatau (164.7-155.7 Ma) in Kazakhstan and from the Jurassic of the Russian Federation (189.6-155.7 Ma) (Chatzimanolis, 2018). Agyrtidae (70 described extant species; Goczał et al, 2024) are represented by nine extinct species (Chatzimanolis, 2018). The agyrtid genus †Mesecanus Newton is described from Jurassic formations of Russia and China.…”
Section: Early Polyphagan Diversificationmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Our knowledge on the flight-control devices is particularly poor in the order Coleoptera (beetles). Although beetles account for about one fifth of all animal species on our planet 12 and exhibit spectacular flight apparatus modification (transformation of fore wings into hardened elytra, together with the development of a sophisticated hind wing folding mechanism), all current knowledge on flight-related mechanosensors located on wings in this order is confined to a morphological analysis of a single species Dytiscus marginalis Linnaeus (Dytiscidae) from the first half of the twentieth century 13 , 14 . Although the distribution of flight-related mechanosensors on beetles' elytra has been recently investigated morphologically in several species (but not in bark beetles) 10 , 15 , 16 , existing studies have not taken into account the phylogenetic background and were thus not suited for evaluating mechanosensor diversity patterns across larger monophyletic group of beetles.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%