2004
DOI: 10.1068/p5236
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: How do people walk to a moving target, and what visual information do they use to do so? Under a pursuit strategy, one would head toward the target's current position, whereas under an interception strategy, one would lead the target, ideally by maintaining a constant target-heading angle (or constant bearing angle). Either strategy may be guided by the egocentric direction of the target, local optic flow from the target, or global optic flow from the background. In four experiments, participants walked throug… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1
1

Citation Types

6
124
2
1

Year Published

2006
2006
2020
2020

Publication Types

Select...
4
4
1

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 123 publications
(133 citation statements)
references
References 33 publications
6
124
2
1
Order By: Relevance
“…The STARS model (Elder et al, 2007) did not explain the interception of moving targets. Fajen and Warren (2004) have demonstrated that humans tend to take an interception strategy that is somewhere between a pursuit strategy, where the target path is followed, and a constant bearing strategy, where a minimal path to the intersection point of the observer path with the target path is taken. Fajen and Warren (2004) required extensive updates to their 2003 model in order to explain these data.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The STARS model (Elder et al, 2007) did not explain the interception of moving targets. Fajen and Warren (2004) have demonstrated that humans tend to take an interception strategy that is somewhere between a pursuit strategy, where the target path is followed, and a constant bearing strategy, where a minimal path to the intersection point of the observer path with the target path is taken. Fajen and Warren (2004) required extensive updates to their 2003 model in order to explain these data.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Fajen and Warren (2004) have demonstrated that humans tend to take an interception strategy that is somewhere between a pursuit strategy, where the target path is followed, and a constant bearing strategy, where a minimal path to the intersection point of the observer path with the target path is taken. Fajen and Warren (2004) required extensive updates to their 2003 model in order to explain these data. Dessing, Peper, Bullock & Beek (2005) demonstrated how visually derived information can be used to catch a moving ball.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This finding can be used to consider the generality of theories of sensory-locomotion coordination based on studies of visual animals. For humans, the relationship between gaze direction and motion has been interpreted in the context of visual cues such as optic flow (Wann and Swapp, 2000;Warren et al, 2001;Wilkie and Wann, 2003;Fajen and Warren, 2004). One leading hypothesis is that a visually guided animal steers by centering the focus of expansion (FOE) of optic flow on a locomotor goal (Gibson, 1950(Gibson, , 1966.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Many important steering tasks are guided by visual information, including walking through a cluttered environment (Fajen & Warren, 2003), driving (Land & Horwood, 1995;Hildreth, Beusmans, Boer, & Royden, 2000;Wallis, Chatziastros, & Bülthoff, 2002), vehicle braking (Lee, 1976), piloting an aircraft (Gibson, Olum, & Rosenblatt, 1955;Beall & Loomis, 1997), and intercepting a moving target on foot (Fajen & Warren, 2004). Steering through a cluttered environment involves the selection of a path that avoids obstacles and simultaneously approaches the intended goal.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%