2017
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0168452
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Visual Adaptations for Mate Detection in the Male Carpenter Bee Xylocopa tenuiscapa

Abstract: Sexual dimorphism in eye structure is attributed to sexual selection in animals that employ vision for locating mates. In many male insects, large eyes and eye regions of higher acuity are believed to facilitate the location of females. Here, we compare various features of male and female eyes in three sympatric carpenter bee species, which include two diurnal species (Xylocopa tenuiscapa and X. leucothorax) as well as a nocturnal species (X. tranquebarica). In X. tenuiscapa, males have larger eyes than female… Show more

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Cited by 24 publications
(25 citation statements)
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References 71 publications
(71 reference statements)
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“…In carpenter bees, sexual dimorphism of eye size is correlated with mating strategy [36]. Males, which defend resources, tend to have dorsal acute zones with more and larger facets and smaller interommatidial angles than females, as described in X. tenuiscapa [14], while no obvious sexual dimorphism is seen in species with other mating strategies. A similar pattern can be seen in bumblebees: males of species, which adopt a perching strategy, for instance B. confusus, B. melaleucus, and B. niveatus, have larger eyes and facets than workers, while those using a patrolling strategy have similarly sized eyes ( [13]; and see Table 2).…”
Section: Sexual Dimorphism Of Eyesmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…In carpenter bees, sexual dimorphism of eye size is correlated with mating strategy [36]. Males, which defend resources, tend to have dorsal acute zones with more and larger facets and smaller interommatidial angles than females, as described in X. tenuiscapa [14], while no obvious sexual dimorphism is seen in species with other mating strategies. A similar pattern can be seen in bumblebees: males of species, which adopt a perching strategy, for instance B. confusus, B. melaleucus, and B. niveatus, have larger eyes and facets than workers, while those using a patrolling strategy have similarly sized eyes ( [13]; and see Table 2).…”
Section: Sexual Dimorphism Of Eyesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Given the same visual field (but see [15]), this results in higher resolution, higher sensitivity, or a combination of both. Because each pixel is served by its own optical apparatus, sensitivity and resolution can vary widely within an eye, leading to acute and bright zones, the most extreme forms of which are found in the eyes of male bees [10][11][12][13][14]. When comparing different species, we mostly focus on the eye regions with highest resolution and sensitivity (Table 1).…”
Section: Visual Fields Sensitivity and Resolution Of The Appositionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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