2019
DOI: 10.1186/s12936-019-2753-7
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Vector competence, vectorial capacity of Nyssorhynchus darlingi and the basic reproduction number of Plasmodium vivax in agricultural settlements in the Amazonian Region of Brazil

Abstract: Background Brazilian malaria control programmes successfully reduced the incidence and mortality rates from 2005 to 2016. Since 2017, increased malaria has been reported across the Amazon. Few field studies focus on the primary malaria vector in high to moderate endemic areas, Nyssorhynchus darlingi , as the key entomological component of malaria risk, and on the metrics of Plasmodium vivax propagation in Amazonian rural communities. … Show more

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Cited by 40 publications
(57 citation statements)
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“…Brazil's government-sponsored settlement of the Amazon region and development of the trans-Amazonian highway has led to substantial deforestation (7,36) and a simultaneous resurgence in malaria (12), partially reversing the prior success of malaria control programs (8). Despite the recent focus on emerging mosquito-transmitted viruses like Zika and chikungunya, malaria is resurging in a number of regions of South America more broadly, particularly in regions undergoing rapid land conversion and political and economic turmoil (11,37,38). Our work provides clear large-scale evidence that deforestation increases malaria, by using econometric techniques that approximate the gold standard of randomized controlled trials with observational data where controlled experiments are impossible.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Brazil's government-sponsored settlement of the Amazon region and development of the trans-Amazonian highway has led to substantial deforestation (7,36) and a simultaneous resurgence in malaria (12), partially reversing the prior success of malaria control programs (8). Despite the recent focus on emerging mosquito-transmitted viruses like Zika and chikungunya, malaria is resurging in a number of regions of South America more broadly, particularly in regions undergoing rapid land conversion and political and economic turmoil (11,37,38). Our work provides clear large-scale evidence that deforestation increases malaria, by using econometric techniques that approximate the gold standard of randomized controlled trials with observational data where controlled experiments are impossible.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Following the late 1960s, malaria expanded rapidly in the Amazon basin, reaching over 600,000 cases a year at the turn of the 21st century-primarily Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum transmitted by Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingiparalleling large-scale deforestation and land use intensification following government-sponsored settlement (7)(8)(9)(10)(11)(12). Prior to this, Brazilian malaria control efforts had dramatically reduced malaria incidence from 6 million cases annually in the 1940s to fewer than 50,000 cases in the early 1960s (8).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For instance, the landscapes shown in Fig. 7 started colonization in the 1970s [34] and currently have high levels of transmission, with an estimated malaria incidence of 45–100 cases per day and a P. vivax reproduction number of 3.3–16.8 [48].
Fig.
…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A recent study carried out in the Brazilian Amazon region reported R 0 of P. vivax transmitted by An. darlingi ranging from 3.3 to 58.7, suggesting malaria hyperendemicity at levels similar to those found for P. falciparum in sub-Saharan Africa [46]. Had we included in the R o estimate the vectorial capacity of the two main biting species in southeastern Venezuela, Ny.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%