2012
DOI: 10.1590/s0073-47212012000100012
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Abstract: ABSTRACT. In order to evaluate the efficiency of different mammalian survey methods, we compared traditional sampling techniques (use of camera-traps on roads and artificial trails, track censuses, and direct field visualization) with an alternative sampling design (camera-traps positioned in natural areas such as natural trails and shelters). We conducted the study in a deciduous Atlantic-Forest park in southern Brazil, and additionally compared our results with a previous intensive study carried out in the s… Show more

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Cited by 14 publications
(20 citation statements)
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“…However, this result could also be due to sampling problems. The use of camera-traps outside the trails and in other habitats (in the canopy, closer to water courses, for example), and night transects in future studies are necessary to clarify this (Harmsen et al 2010, Melo et al 2012. The observed richness (22 species) represented 70.8% of the estimated one (31.1 species).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…However, this result could also be due to sampling problems. The use of camera-traps outside the trails and in other habitats (in the canopy, closer to water courses, for example), and night transects in future studies are necessary to clarify this (Harmsen et al 2010, Melo et al 2012. The observed richness (22 species) represented 70.8% of the estimated one (31.1 species).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Usually, the period needed to efficiently survey an area for species inventory studies is inversely proportional to the number of camera traps used (Rovero et al, 2013). Moreover, a larger number of camera traps allows modification of their spatial distribution, thereby improving sampling efficiency (Melo et al, 2012;SrbekAraujo & Chiarello, 2013) and allowing lower-density and cryptic species to be recorded (Melo et al, 2012). For example, using different varying camera trap positions (e.g., monitoring both natural and artificial trails and setting cameras at potential animal shelters), can increase sampling efficiency and improve the chances of recording different mammalian species (Melo et al, 2012).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Camera-trapping is highly accurate because species may be clearly identified from photos (SrbekAraujo & Chiarello, 2005), with the enhanced camera technology over the years facilitating vast improvements in accuracy (Sunarto et al, 2013). Moreover, different sampling designs have been developed to enhance the use and accuracy of camera traps in rainforest (e.g., Srbek-Araujo & Chiarello, 2005, 2007, 2013Kelly, 2008;Tobler et al, 2008;Melo et al, 2012). However, camera-trapping is expensive, especially for short-term studies, and implies a high initial cost investment in field material (Silveira et al, 2003;Lyra-Jorge et al, 2008b).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Photographs 1) taken on the same date with 30-minute time intervals, and 2) taken at the same hour and date for different individuals of the same species and for different individuals of different species, were considered independent events following Yasuda, (2004), MonroyVilchis et al (2010), Abi-Said & Amr (2012), and Lira- Torres & Briones-Salas (2012). After randomizing the sample 1,000 times, independent events were used to calculate the species accumulation curve following Melo et al (2012). In the curve, the addition of new species was a function of the number of sampling days per active camera between the second semester of 2009 and the first semester of 2011.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Melo et al (2012) concluded that increasing the sampling area and including a greater number of plant covers would attain a better estimate of species diversity. In this study, the SFFOQ area is small compared with those of other studies, especially for the detection of species with wide range and specific habits.…”
Section: Universitas Scientiarum Vol 22 (1): 9-29mentioning
confidence: 99%