2019
DOI: 10.1017/s0047279419000199
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Unsettling the Anti-Welfare Commonsense: The Potential in Participatory Research with People Living in Poverty

Abstract: Drawing on participatory research with people living in poverty, this article details the possibilities inherent in this research tradition and its particular applicability and as yet often unrealised potential for poverty and social security research. The dominant framing of ‘welfare’ and poverty foregrounds elite political and politicised accounts, which place emphasis on individual and behavioural drivers of poverty, and imply that the receipt of ‘welfare’ is necessarily and inevitably problematic. A large … Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(19 citation statements)
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“…While being Left politically was the only statistically significant predictor in all years, being on out‐of‐work state benefits was also significant in three of the four years. This strong support from benefit claimants perhaps sheds light on why social policy authors (for example, Patrick, 2020) have praised insights from these ‘experts by experience’ while condemning the views of sections of the wider public.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 96%
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“…While being Left politically was the only statistically significant predictor in all years, being on out‐of‐work state benefits was also significant in three of the four years. This strong support from benefit claimants perhaps sheds light on why social policy authors (for example, Patrick, 2020) have praised insights from these ‘experts by experience’ while condemning the views of sections of the wider public.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…They have attributed this failure to the impact of the mass media and to their own campaign tactics. Social policy authors and anti‐poverty organisations have long criticised the media (Golding & Middleton, 1982), but the rise of so‐called ‘poverty porn’ television documentaries, which have sometimes portrayed out‐of‐work benefit claimants as work‐shy and living comfortably, is considered particularly harmful to campaigns (Scott Paul, 2016; Shildrick, 2018; Patrick, 2020). The traditional tactic of presenting the public with facts is now widely considered ineffective (Scott Paul, 2016; G. Smith, 2016; Orton, 2019).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…As noted by Patrick (2020), “the dominant framing of ‘welfare’ and poverty foregrounds elite political and politicised accounts, which place emphasis on individual and behavioural drivers of poverty, and imply that the receipt of ‘welfare’ is necessarily and inevitably problematic” (2019, p. 251). This framing of the taxed and the taxed‐not also problematises welfare, but the statistics are used in characterising half the national population or more, rather than a stigmatised minority.…”
Section: Taxpayer and Tax Consumers—an Increasingly Popular Discoursementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Patrick and Simpson's research draws on what they describe as both ‘top‐down’ and ‘bottom‐up’ perspectives. The interest in a bottom‐up perspective reflects renewed and growing attention being given to what in broad terms can be called participatory research approaches in social policy (Patrick, 2019) and the role of ‘lived experience’ data (McIntosh & Wright, 2019). These sorts of data can provide insights and knowledge which might otherwise be absent in social policy debate (see also Summers & Young, 2020).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%