2007
DOI: 10.1002/glia.20490
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Transplantation of Schwann cells and/or olfactory ensheathing glia into the contused spinal cord: Survival, migration, axon association, and functional recovery

Abstract: Schwann cells (SCs) and olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) have shown promise for spinal cord injury repair. We sought their in vivo identification following transplantation into the contused adult rat spinal cord at 1 week post-injury by: (i) DNA in situ hybridization (ISH) with a Y-chromosome specific probe to identify male transplants in female rats and (ii) lentiviral vector-mediated expression of EGFP. Survival, migration, and axon-glia association were quantified from 3 days to 9 weeks post-transplantation… Show more

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Cited by 266 publications
(299 citation statements)
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“…This was comparable to concentrations that have produced significant functional improvements in vivo in rat SCI models (11,16). Despite the robust levels of ChABC seen in vitro, it is possible that a proportion of OMCs will not survive following SCI transplantation (73). Therefore, with our current transduction efficiency of 34%, there may not be enough surviving ChABC-producing cells at the site of injury to achieve the desired in vivo efficacy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 54%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This was comparable to concentrations that have produced significant functional improvements in vivo in rat SCI models (11,16). Despite the robust levels of ChABC seen in vitro, it is possible that a proportion of OMCs will not survive following SCI transplantation (73). Therefore, with our current transduction efficiency of 34%, there may not be enough surviving ChABC-producing cells at the site of injury to achieve the desired in vivo efficacy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 54%
“…However, if necessary we can increase the transduction percentage of the OMCs by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to select OMCs expressing GFP (74,75), and therefore ChABC, leading to a cell transplant with closer to 100% transduction. It should be noted that from a clinical standpoint, OMC transplants are more likely to be given in the 'chronic' phase of SCI, at which point cell survival is greater than with acute transplantation (73). Clinical transplantation protocols will also include injection of cells cranial and caudal to the lesion, allowing cells to migrate into the lesion (76), which could also improve efficacy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…10 Before surgery, animals were anesthetized with Hypnorm (fentanyl citrate, 120 ml per 200 g body weight; Janssen Pharmaceutics, Beerse, Belgium) and Midazolam (0.75 mg in 150 ml per 200 g body weight; S.C.; Sabex, Boucherville, QC, Canada). After a T7-9 laminectomy of the vertebral segment, 1 mm of spinal cord at Th8 was removed.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition to potentially myelinating regenerated axons, Schwann cells express cell adhesion molecules, produce components of the extracellular matrix, and secrete multiple neurotrophic factors [44][45][46][47][48][49][50][51][52][53]. Whether grafted Schwann cells provide an advantage in comparision with other potential cell grafts remains to be determined; however, as the grafted cells survive poorly in the lesioned spinal cord, they are soon replaced by migrating endogenous Schwann cells [54,55].…”
Section: Provision Of Growth-promoting Substrates To Sites Of Injurymentioning
confidence: 99%