2018
DOI: 10.1097/aap.0000000000000840
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Abstract: A greater number of patients experienced a quicker onset of headache relief, without any new complications, from treatment with SPGB versus EBP. We believe that SPGB is a safe, inexpensive, and well-tolerated treatment. We hope that clinical trials will be conducted in the future that will confirm our findings and allow us to recommend SPGB for PDPH treatment prior to offering patients EBP.

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Cited by 31 publications
(42 citation statements)
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References 35 publications
(31 reference statements)
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“…Hence, we opted for this route in our study. The efficacy of SPGB in relieving pain secondary to PDPH has been well proven[ 1 6 7 8 ] and it is considered as a safe procedure as the contraindications are local nasal infections and base of skull fracture only. [ 7 ]…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Hence, we opted for this route in our study. The efficacy of SPGB in relieving pain secondary to PDPH has been well proven[ 1 6 7 8 ] and it is considered as a safe procedure as the contraindications are local nasal infections and base of skull fracture only. [ 7 ]…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[ 5 ] Sphenopalatine ganglion block (SPGB), a non-invasive intervention with minimal adverse effects and high efficacy, had been tried as a treatment modality of PDPH. [ 1 6 7 8 ] SPGB efficacy has been proved in the management of migraine[ 9 ] and facial pain. [ 10 ] There are a number of case reports and case series reporting the success of SPGB for the management of spinal headache in obstetric patients.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…28 In addition, there are anecdotal reports for the efficacy of this treatment in patients with some secondary headaches (eg, post-dural puncture headache, post-traumatic headache, and post-herpetic neuralgia). [29][30][31] Interestingly, however, data as to the efficacy of SPG block in HC are scarce. Given some shared clinical features and underlying pathogensis between HC and CH, and the evidence for efficacy of SPG block in the latter, it can be speculated that blocking the SPG may be beneficial in HC as well.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There has been increased interest in regional analgesic techniques for treatment of PDPH, due to their success in the treatment of other headache syndromes. Several case reports and case series have been published regarding the use of peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) for PDPH, most of which report the use of sphenopalatine ganglion block (SPGB), greater occipital nerve block (GONB) and trigger point infiltration (TPI) 5–12…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%