2022
DOI: 10.1111/ffe.13815
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Three‐dimensional fatigue crack growth simulation and fatigue life assessment based on finite element analysis

Abstract: Damage tolerance design allows manufactures to assess fatigue crack propagation of components containing initial defects. A new modeling approach is proposed to carry out a systematic crack growth analysis based on an analytical method using reduced order models and three‐dimensional (3D) finite element (FE)‐based fatigue crack growth (FCG) analysis. 3D FE‐based FCG analysis is adopted as an advanced modeling approach for component geometries without any simplifications with respect to crack front shape or pla… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2

Citation Types

0
2
0

Year Published

2023
2023
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
5

Relationship

0
5

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 5 publications
(2 citation statements)
references
References 33 publications
(36 reference statements)
0
2
0
Order By: Relevance
“…In recent years, the evolution of fatigue crack shapes has emerged as a topic of considerable interest. Numerous research studies have been undertaken to investigate crack shapes [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18], and the collective findings suggest that finite thickness specimens exhibit a phenomenon known as the "tunneling effect." Specifically, in specimens with an initially straight crack that eventually penetrates, the central crack front advances ahead of all others as the loading cycles progress.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In recent years, the evolution of fatigue crack shapes has emerged as a topic of considerable interest. Numerous research studies have been undertaken to investigate crack shapes [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18], and the collective findings suggest that finite thickness specimens exhibit a phenomenon known as the "tunneling effect." Specifically, in specimens with an initially straight crack that eventually penetrates, the central crack front advances ahead of all others as the loading cycles progress.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The crack inversion based on numerical technique includes forward analysis and objective function minimization. Numerical methods which can be used for forward analysis include finite element method [1][2][3], meshless method [4][5][6], boundary element method [7][8][9][10], and XFEM [11][12][13], etc. The traditional finite element method relies too much on mesh, and the mesh needs to be re-divided in each iteration.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%