2010
DOI: 10.1002/bdrc.20173
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Abstract: It is becoming increasingly clear that Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by mechanical signals. Mechanical forces generated intrinsically within the cell in response to its extracellular environment, and extrinsic mechanical signals imposed upon the cell by the extracellular environment, play a central role in determining MSC fate. This paper reviews chondrogenesis and osteogenesis during skeletogenesis, and then considers the role of mechanics in regulating limb development and regenera… Show more

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Cited by 206 publications
(139 citation statements)
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“…MSCs can differentiate into various cell lineages, including adipocyte, osteoblast, chondrocyte, myoblast, and tenocyte [15,91]; it may thus be likely that MSCs can be differentiated into IVD-like cells for tissue engineering applications. MSC differentiation can be directed by different factors, such as growth factors, or more importantly by mechanical factors, including shear, tension, compressive strain and hydrostatic pressure, all depending on the local environment such as matrix stiffness and structural arrangement, and the resulting cell shape and morphology differences, pH, oxygen and nutrient supply [52,93]. [45,58,70,72,122,123] MSCs in the IVD environment…”
Section: Ivd Tissue Engineeringmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…MSCs can differentiate into various cell lineages, including adipocyte, osteoblast, chondrocyte, myoblast, and tenocyte [15,91]; it may thus be likely that MSCs can be differentiated into IVD-like cells for tissue engineering applications. MSC differentiation can be directed by different factors, such as growth factors, or more importantly by mechanical factors, including shear, tension, compressive strain and hydrostatic pressure, all depending on the local environment such as matrix stiffness and structural arrangement, and the resulting cell shape and morphology differences, pH, oxygen and nutrient supply [52,93]. [45,58,70,72,122,123] MSCs in the IVD environment…”
Section: Ivd Tissue Engineeringmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[36][37][38] Human meniscal specimens appear to fail at higher strains with average values between 21 and 55% of maximum strains. 39 Inner meniscus cells lose their chondrogenic phenotypes with an in vitro culture procedure.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore identifying expansion and differentiation conditions that promote a more chondrogenic phenotype is critical to enhancing their utility for cartilage tissue engineering applications. Differentiation conditions that have been shown to promote the chondrogenic potential of MSCs include a low oxygen (5%) microenvironment (Khan et al 2007;Buckley et al 2010a;Meyer et al 2010), various combinations of growth factors (Mastrogiacomo et al 2001;Sakimura et al 2006;Hennig et al 2007;Diekman et al 2010;Buxton et al 2011) and mechanical signals (Huang et al 2005;Mauck et al 2007;Huang et al 2010a;Huang et al 2010b;Kelly and Jacobs 2010;Li et al 2010; Thorpe et al 2010;Haugh et al 2011). …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%