2007
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.143.12.1570
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The Role of Furry Pets in Eczema

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Cited by 73 publications
(51 citation statements)
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“…Studies on pets also proposed dog exposure as a protective factor [36] , while for cat exposure, the situation is less clear with much more heterogeneous results [37] . Consequently to a genetically determined skin barrier dysfunction and the aggravating effect of environmental factors, nonatopic dermatitis is the first and most prevalent manifestation of AD early in life.…”
Section: Environmental Factors and Microbial Exposurementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Studies on pets also proposed dog exposure as a protective factor [36] , while for cat exposure, the situation is less clear with much more heterogeneous results [37] . Consequently to a genetically determined skin barrier dysfunction and the aggravating effect of environmental factors, nonatopic dermatitis is the first and most prevalent manifestation of AD early in life.…”
Section: Environmental Factors and Microbial Exposurementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Current knowledge of risk factors and biological mechanisms involved in these diseases does not allow a coherent explanation. Analyses based on systematic reviews concerning environmental risk factors of AD resulted in, for example, an increased risk of AD in children with antibiotics in the first years of life, 61 a favorable or inconsistent effect of exposure to pets, [62][63][64] and an inverse association between AD and endotoxin as well as early day care. 64 None of these risk factors was investigated in systematic reviews on IBD, T1D, and RA.…”
Section: Possible Explanationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…33 Specific risk factors for eczema expression in the environment include furry pets; however, there is evidence that these can also have protective effects. 34 Allergic factors such as exposure to the house dust mite could be important, but non-allergic factors such as exposure to nylon clothing, dust or shampoo may also be important. 35 …”
Section: Environmentmentioning
confidence: 99%