2020
DOI: 10.4337/9781788970310
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The Infrastructured State

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Cited by 6 publications
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“…Such vulnerabilities have focused states on issues of criticality where such cascade effects could challenge state territoriality (Rinaldi et al 2001). The link between infrastructure and state territoriality does offer an evident rationalisation for the position of authors such as Larkin (2013) who argue that the notion of an embedded NIS can make little sense when the state can use it as an expression of power and legitimacy and offer a means of discourse within its population (see Turner 2020). As a means of reinforcing its territoriality, the state has an incentive to pursue what Larkin terms 'suprastructures'.…”
Section: The Territorial State and Its Infrastructure Systemmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Such vulnerabilities have focused states on issues of criticality where such cascade effects could challenge state territoriality (Rinaldi et al 2001). The link between infrastructure and state territoriality does offer an evident rationalisation for the position of authors such as Larkin (2013) who argue that the notion of an embedded NIS can make little sense when the state can use it as an expression of power and legitimacy and offer a means of discourse within its population (see Turner 2020). As a means of reinforcing its territoriality, the state has an incentive to pursue what Larkin terms 'suprastructures'.…”
Section: The Territorial State and Its Infrastructure Systemmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The systemic nature of the NIS underscores that it is more than just the sum of infrastructure located within the borders of a state. For simplicity, the NIS is sub-divided into differing types of infrastructure (Turner 2020): economic infrastructures (that is those that facilitate the flow of economic products/processes within a territory); and enabling infrastructures (those social and institutional structures and systems that enable the effective operation of economic infrastructure) (Howe et al 2016). Whilst much of the focus within the NIS has been upon the physical economic infrastructures (as indeed reflected within the structure of this book), there has been -over time -an increased focus upon soft infrastructure systems (Niskanen 1991).…”
Section: The Territorial State and Its Infrastructure Systemmentioning
confidence: 99%
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