volume 146, issue Supplement 3, PS292-S297 2020
DOI: 10.1542/peds.2020-0242i
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Louise Paatsch, Dianne Toe

Abstract: Increasingly, across the globe, deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students are educated in mainstream schools using spoken language for communication. Classroom interactions require the use of sophisticated pragmatic language skills. Pragmatic skills can be delayed in DHH students and create challenges for the social and emotional adjustment of DHH students at school. School-aged DHH children may present to pediatric health care providers with concerns about communicating effectively and forming friendships with …

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