2005
DOI: 10.1109/mnet.2005.1453395
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The IEEE 802.11g standard for high data rate WLANs

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Cited by 139 publications
(68 citation statements)
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“…The test system had a universal software radio peripheral device [15] that recorded transmissions from offthe-shelf 802.11g WIFI routers [14]. The TOA of the received preamble was estimated in various locations and compared to the true TOA 1 .…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The test system had a universal software radio peripheral device [15] that recorded transmissions from offthe-shelf 802.11g WIFI routers [14]. The TOA of the received preamble was estimated in various locations and compared to the true TOA 1 .…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The 6 Mb/s has an advantage over 11 Mb/s as the preamble associated with the 802.11 OFDM rates (20 µs) is considerably shorter than the one for the 802.11b rates (96/192 µs for the short/long preamble) [6]. We can perform a simple calculation to determine if this advantage is significant; we conclude it is not.…”
Section: Practical Implications For Rate Controlmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…As the 6 Mb/s rate has a shorter preamble than the 11 Mb/s rate (20µs instead of 96 or 192µs [6]), this does not a priori mean that its throughput is always lower than that of the 11 Mb/s rate. We show, however, that the advantage conferred by the shorter preamble at 6 Mb/s is negligible when there is noise on the medium and thus the 6 Mb/s rate is effectively redundant 2 .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…With Wi-Fi (802.11g) [17], the frames have a known composition as illustrated in Figure 4. The energy consumption for one packet of data can be computed with the following function: E(payload) = {P LCP preamble + (M ACheader + IP header + T CP header + payload) * ByteRate} * T ransmitP ower with IPheader, TCPheader and ByteRate known from [18] and [19] and T ransmitP ower previously measured.…”
Section: Consumption Approximation For Tcpmentioning
confidence: 99%