2016
DOI: 10.3109/09638288.2015.1107783
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The human dimensions of post-stroke homecare: experiences of older carers from diverse ethnic groups

Abstract: Purpose: Very little is known about how older people from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups caring for someone after a stroke access and engage with social care services. This paper explores both the experiences of carers whose relative was receiving social care services in their own home and the value of a theory of humanising care to understand and explain these experiences. Method Conclusions:Carers from BME and White British groups share many experiences of homecare although language and cultural dif… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(39 citation statements)
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References 52 publications
(57 reference statements)
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“…The humanizing values framework describes eight philosophically informed dimensions (e.g., ‘uniqueness versus homogenisation’; ‘sense making versus loss of meaning’; ‘agency versus passivity’; ‘togetherness versus isolation’), which it has been argued can inform nurse education (Scammell et al . ) and understanding stroke care (Pound and Greenwood ). Such a framework may also be useful in SLT education and practice, placing what it means to be human at the heart of all SLT interactions.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The humanizing values framework describes eight philosophically informed dimensions (e.g., ‘uniqueness versus homogenisation’; ‘sense making versus loss of meaning’; ‘agency versus passivity’; ‘togetherness versus isolation’), which it has been argued can inform nurse education (Scammell et al . ) and understanding stroke care (Pound and Greenwood ). Such a framework may also be useful in SLT education and practice, placing what it means to be human at the heart of all SLT interactions.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The humanizing values framework has been suggested as one way of enabling healthcare professionals to provide person-centred care despite the pressure of the system, through placing value on the 'things that make us feel more human' (Galvin and Todres 2012). The humanizing values framework describes eight philosophically informed dimensions (e.g., 'uniqueness versus homogenisation'; 'sense making versus loss of meaning'; 'agency versus passivity'; 'togetherness versus isolation'), which it has been argued can inform nurse education (Scammell et al 2012) and understanding stroke care (Pound and Greenwood 2016). Such a framework may also be useful in SLT education and practice, placing what it means to be human at the heart of all SLT interactions.…”
Section: Future Directions and Implicationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…What they perceived as important was that the therapeutic interactions made them feel “human,” valued, and noticed as people. Others have argued that, through embracing frameworks such as the humanizing values framework ( Galvin & Todres, 2012 ), stroke care may become more person-centered and holistic ( Pound & Greenwood, 2016 ), enabling health care workers to accord value to interactions that may make a profound difference to their patients, but do not necessarily lead to easy-to-measure change.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Key considerations for policy and practice include the health and care profile of older carers, with many being both provider and recipient of care (Carers UK, 2016;Carers Trust, 2019); the 'reversed' gender profile of carers aged eighty-five or over, with three out of five being male; and the increasing number of older carers from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities (Carers UK, 2016; see also Dahlberg et al, 2007;Pound and Greenwood, 2016).…”
Section: Olde R Carersmentioning
confidence: 99%