2020
DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2019-105637
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The ethical case for non-directed postmortem sperm donation

Abstract: In this article we outline and defend the concept of voluntary non-directed postmortem sperm donation. This approach offers a potential means of increasing the quantity and heterogeneity of donor sperm. This is pertinent given the present context of a donor sperm shortage in the UK. Beyond making the case that it is technically feasible for dead men to donate their sperm for use in reproduction, we argue that this is ethically permissible. The inability to access donor sperm and the suffering this causes, we a… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…In this article, we do not discuss whether bringing Ellie’s children into world would harm or wrong them; the question of whether one can be harmed by being brought into existence is contentious 18 19. As Hodson and Parker put it in the context of postmortem sperm donation, posthumous conception may come with some disadvantages for offspring, but their suffering would have to be extraordinarily severe to be incompatible with a worthwhile life 20. Our focus here is, therefore, not on whether Ellie’s child would be harmed, but on whether her wishes have moral force once the question of harm to offspring is set aside.…”
Section: Is It Possible To Wrong Someone After Their Death?mentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In this article, we do not discuss whether bringing Ellie’s children into world would harm or wrong them; the question of whether one can be harmed by being brought into existence is contentious 18 19. As Hodson and Parker put it in the context of postmortem sperm donation, posthumous conception may come with some disadvantages for offspring, but their suffering would have to be extraordinarily severe to be incompatible with a worthwhile life 20. Our focus here is, therefore, not on whether Ellie’s child would be harmed, but on whether her wishes have moral force once the question of harm to offspring is set aside.…”
Section: Is It Possible To Wrong Someone After Their Death?mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…18,19 As Hodson and Parker put it in the context of post-mortem sperm donation, posthumous conception may come with some disadvantages for offspring, but their suffering would have to be extraordinarily severe to be incompatible with a worthwhile life. 20 Our focus here is therefore not on whether Ellie's child would be harmed, but on whether her wishes have moral force once the question of harm to offspring is set aside.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Men, too, can donate sperm cells for altruistic or pecuniary reasons [49][50][51][52], but prohibition of anonymous donation over the last years has led to a shortage of sperm cells in many sperm banks around the world. Recently, some bioethicists have suggested that the institutionalization of presumed consent for post-mortem sperm cells donation might be introduced as a solution for the problem relative to the current shortage of male gametes in sperm banks [53]. IVG of human cells, on the other hand, could reduce drastically the demand for donation of male and female reproductive cells, making access to human gametes much easier and cheaper for prospective parents and researchers.…”
Section: Ivg and Crispr As A Means Of Gcementioning
confidence: 99%
“…11-12), [14] (p. 279), [15] (pp. [53][54]. One can of course have better cognitive performance without having increased intelligence in the sense I will focus on in this article.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%