2003
DOI: 10.1002/j.2050-0416.2003.tb00162.x
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The Effects of Osmotic Pressure and Ethanol on Yeast Viability and Morphology

Abstract: The selection of a brewing yeast strain with the required fermentation and recycling characteristics is critical. The yeast strain will influence the rate and extent of fermentation, the flavour characteristics and the overall quality and stability of the finished beer, and consequently, the economic viability of the brewery. Since high gravity worts can have a deleterious effect on yeast fermentation performance, it is imperative that the strain selected be suitable for this environment, which includes a capa… Show more

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Cited by 95 publications
(72 citation statements)
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References 29 publications
(41 reference statements)
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“…increases specific gravity, viscosity, and interfacial surface tension) which can, in turn, influence mixing patterns, wort oxygen solubility, and rate of oxygen dissolution. Moreover, high osmotic pressure, 14,33,49,50,54,58 the formation of elevated levels of toxic fermentation by-products (e.g. ethanol), 11,65 and limiting yeast nutritional factors 9 have been implicated as key factors contributing to the deleterious results on yeast fermentation performance under very-high-gravity conditions.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…increases specific gravity, viscosity, and interfacial surface tension) which can, in turn, influence mixing patterns, wort oxygen solubility, and rate of oxygen dissolution. Moreover, high osmotic pressure, 14,33,49,50,54,58 the formation of elevated levels of toxic fermentation by-products (e.g. ethanol), 11,65 and limiting yeast nutritional factors 9 have been implicated as key factors contributing to the deleterious results on yeast fermentation performance under very-high-gravity conditions.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Figures 26 and 27 illustrate experiments with 12 and 20°Plato worts fermented with a lager and an ale yeast strain. Cell viability decreased in both strains within the first 24 h of fermentation 99 . However, the decrease in viability was exacerbated with the 20°Plato compared to the 12°Plato wort.…”
Section: Influence Of High Gravity Worts On Yeast Viabilitymentioning
confidence: 94%
“…However, the decrease in viability was exacerbated with the 20°Plato compared to the 12°Plato wort. However, with both yeast types (which are representative of a number of lager and ale strains studied 99 data not shown) the viability recovered later in the fermentation. In addition, for reasons that are unclear, ale strains maintained higher viability than lager strains 102 .…”
Section: Influence Of High Gravity Worts On Yeast Viabilitymentioning
confidence: 95%
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“…The level of cell wall bound glycogen was found to increase to a maximum level by 36 h and the level was parallel with an increase in the ethanol level. An increase in ethanol is known to affect the growth and viability of yeast 15,23 . The correlating increase in cell wall bound glycogen suggests that this pool of glycogen probably plays a vital role in overcoming ethanol stress.…”
Section: Effect Of Levels Of Cell Wall Bound Glycogen On Fermentationmentioning
confidence: 99%