1926
DOI: 10.1021/ja01420a001
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Abstract: In a previous investigation,2 the effect of increased glass surface on the velocity of the reaction between nitric oxide and oxygen was studied. It appeared that this rapid reaction is not greatly affected by surface; that it takes place chiefly in the gas phase. When we consider that the rate of the reaction which we measure is the sum of the rates by different paths, altering the kind or amount of surface may be supplying or removing a catalyst. Accordingly, the net speed may be altered by introducing or eli… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
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“…In addition, the nature of the reactor surface affected the rate. This observation was made in the studies of Hasche (1926) and Smith (1943).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 67%
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“…In addition, the nature of the reactor surface affected the rate. This observation was made in the studies of Hasche (1926) and Smith (1943).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 67%
“…Some investigators have reported that water vapor has no effect on the oxidation Hall, 1966, 1967; Treacy and Daniels, 1955). Others have found that water vapor may increase or decrease the rate of oxidation (Burdick, 1922;Hasche, 1926; Smith, 1943;Stoddart, 1939). Earlier studies in this laboratory showed that nitrogen dioxide was consumed in the gas phase by water vapor.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 96%
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“…workers, are apparently good only for dry gases, since with wet gases, with paraffin-coated vessels, or in contact with charcoal, the rate constants are quite different (5, 6,14). It seems unlikely that Bodenstein's rate data are exactly applicable under the conditions obtaining in industrial absorption equipment, although Taylor,Chilton,and Handforth (92) found them of value in this connection.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%