2019
DOI: 10.1093/cid/ciz859
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The Effect of Helminth Infections and Their Treatment on Metabolic Outcomes: Results of a Cluster-Randomized Trial

Abstract: Background Helminth infection may influence cardiometabolic risk through effects on inflammation and metabolism. We hypothesised that helminths are protective and their treatment detrimental to metabolic outcomes. Methods We conducted a cluster-randomised trial in 26 fishing communities, Lake Victoria, Uganda. We investigated effects of community-wide intensive (quarterly single-dose praziquantel, triple dose albendazole) ver… Show more

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Cited by 36 publications
(70 citation statements)
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References 39 publications
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“…LDL-c levels were significantly lower in lean Chinese subjects with chronic S. japonicum infection when compared to uninfected individuals [24]. Finally, during the preparation of the manuscript, the results of a study investigating the effects of S. mansoni infection on metabolic outcomes in the framework of the LaVIISWA trial conducted in the highly-endemic region of Lake Victoria in Uganda became available [25]. Interestingly, a negative association between the intensity of S. mansoni infection and serum TC, HDL-c, LDL-c and TG levels was found [25].…”
Section: Plos Neglected Tropical Diseasesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…LDL-c levels were significantly lower in lean Chinese subjects with chronic S. japonicum infection when compared to uninfected individuals [24]. Finally, during the preparation of the manuscript, the results of a study investigating the effects of S. mansoni infection on metabolic outcomes in the framework of the LaVIISWA trial conducted in the highly-endemic region of Lake Victoria in Uganda became available [25]. Interestingly, a negative association between the intensity of S. mansoni infection and serum TC, HDL-c, LDL-c and TG levels was found [25].…”
Section: Plos Neglected Tropical Diseasesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…58 Two others studies in Indonesia and Uganda demonstrated similar outcomes after treatment against STHs and S. mansoni, respectively. 59,60 Finally, a cross-sectional analyses of several studies linking helminth infection and metabolic syndrome confirmed the trend towards a decreased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in people with past or present helminth infection. 61 Although this emerging literature is intriguing, further work is certainly required to show exactly how these effects are mediated.…”
Section: A Negative Association Between Helminth Infection and Metabomentioning
confidence: 65%
“…More importantly, they could show a significant deterioration of these parameters after anthelmintic therapies . Two others studies in Indonesia and Uganda demonstrated similar outcomes after treatment against STHs and S. mansoni, respectively . Finally, a cross‐sectional analyses of several studies linking helminth infection and metabolic syndrome confirmed the trend towards a decreased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in people with past or present helminth infection .…”
Section: Helminth Infection and Metabolic Statusmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose were defined, according to the WHO classification, as fasting plasma glucose of ≥7.0 mmol/L and 6.1-6.9 mmol/L, respectively 31,32 . Hypertension was defined as diastolic blood pressure of ≥90 mmHg or systolic blood pressure of ≥140 mmHg in participants ≥18 years of age 33 . Participants <18 years old were categorised to be hypertensive if their systolic or diastolic blood pressures were above the 95 th percentile using the Centers for Disease Control blood pressure charts for children and adolescents 34 .…”
Section: Variablesmentioning
confidence: 99%