2021
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-64548-9_10
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The Behaviour of Kissing Bugs

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Cited by 6 publications
(7 citation statements)
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“…As proposed before by several other authors [ 6 , 17 , 21 , 52 , 53 ], a hypothesis to explain the increase in the number of bites and the decrease in host detection time, which was more evident in triatomines with a higher T. cruzi load, could be a competition between the triatomine and T. cruzi for the nutrients in the ingested blood, leading these insects to a more advanced state of starvation when compared to individuals with a lower parasite load, and those who are non-infected. Triatomines in this state may become more receptive to stimuli: They do not sit and wait until a host appears or move randomly in search of signals; instead, they orient themselves with the air streams to capture smells of interest [ 7 , 54 ]. Another response that may increase due to the lack of nutrients is sensitivity to ammonia that is present in the urine and sweat of hosts, which serves as an attraction factor in T. infestans [ 55 ]; this response has been measured in the antennae of R. prolixus , and it increases during starvation [ 56 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…As proposed before by several other authors [ 6 , 17 , 21 , 52 , 53 ], a hypothesis to explain the increase in the number of bites and the decrease in host detection time, which was more evident in triatomines with a higher T. cruzi load, could be a competition between the triatomine and T. cruzi for the nutrients in the ingested blood, leading these insects to a more advanced state of starvation when compared to individuals with a lower parasite load, and those who are non-infected. Triatomines in this state may become more receptive to stimuli: They do not sit and wait until a host appears or move randomly in search of signals; instead, they orient themselves with the air streams to capture smells of interest [ 7 , 54 ]. Another response that may increase due to the lack of nutrients is sensitivity to ammonia that is present in the urine and sweat of hosts, which serves as an attraction factor in T. infestans [ 55 ]; this response has been measured in the antennae of R. prolixus , and it increases during starvation [ 56 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The observation that the individuals did not defecate on the mouse when they were fed may be related to the fact that the most accessible points for biting (fewer hairs) and sources of emission of cues used for their detection (temperature, CO 2 , etc.) [ 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 ] were perceived at the level of the triatomine, in its horizontal plane of displacement.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…At nightfall, they eventually start non-oriented locomotor activity, outside shelters to search for hosts. For host recognition, starved bugs detect cues released by vertebrates, such as radiant heat, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and other odorants (2). The decision to leave a shelter and engage in foraging is risky, as triatomine hosts are often predators as well.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%