2010
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaridenv.2009.07.007
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Termite assemblages in three habitats under different disturbance regimes in the semi-arid Caatinga of NE Brazil

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Cited by 80 publications
(58 citation statements)
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“…Site 5 (Bayan Lepas) had the smallest foraging population size, probably due to the size of the house and the colony was just below the house where human activities could have disturbed the foraging activities of the termites (Vasconcellos et al 2010). Furthermore, it is possible that the age of termite colonies might be the reason of finding larger or smaller colonies in some places than others.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Site 5 (Bayan Lepas) had the smallest foraging population size, probably due to the size of the house and the colony was just below the house where human activities could have disturbed the foraging activities of the termites (Vasconcellos et al 2010). Furthermore, it is possible that the age of termite colonies might be the reason of finding larger or smaller colonies in some places than others.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Furthermore, it is possible that the age of termite colonies might be the reason of finding larger or smaller colonies in some places than others. Maybe, the smaller colonies are newly established colonies, while the larger ones have been in the area for a long time (Husseneder 2005;Vasconcellos et al 2010).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…All genera and species identified were classified into five feeding groups, according to the classification suggested by Swift and Bignell (2001), and to information in the literature (Gontijo & Domingos, 1991;DeSouza & Brown, 1994;Mélo & Bandeira, 2004;Reis & Cancello, 2007;Vasconcellos et al, 2010;Alves et al, 2011), namely: (WF) wood-feeders (termites feeding on wood and wood litter, including dead branches still attached to trees); (SF) soil-feeders (termites feeding deliberately on mineral soil, with higher proportions of soil organic matter and silica, and lower proportions of recognizable plant tissue than in other groups); (SWF) soil/ wood interface-feeders (termites feeding in highly decayed wood which has become friable and soul-like, or predominantly within soil under logs or soil plastered on the surface or inside of rotting logs or mixed with leaf litter in stilt-root complexes); (LF) litter-foragers (termites foraging on leaves and small woody items, often taken back and stored temporarily in the nest); and (SPF) specialized-feeders (species of termites that feed on fungi, algae, lichens on the bark of trees, manure and vertebrate carcasses).…”
Section: Feeding Groupsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Some abiotic variables were also evaluated, in order to check, for example, if there was some sort of association between these variables and the established environmental structures. Also, it was investigated if termites could reflect, on their community composition, the variation of the habitat, as observed in other environments, like in humid (Eggleton et al, 2002;Jones et al, 2003) and dry tropical forest (Vasconcellos et al, 2010;Alves et al, 2011).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Termites are specially known in the Brazilian Amazon (Bandeira & Macambira, 1988;Constantino, 1992;Constantino & Cancello, 1992;DeSouza & Brown, 1994), Atlantic Forest (Brandão, 1998;Souza et al, 2012;Cancello et al, 2014), Caatinga (Vasconcellos et al, 2010;Vasconcellos & Moura, 2014) and Cerrado (Mathews, 1977;Constantino, 2005;Cunha et al, 2006). More complete lists are available in Cancello (1996) and Constantino & Acioli (2008).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%