2014
DOI: 10.1016/j.jembe.2014.06.015
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Temporal variation in richness and composition of recruits in a diverse cnidarian assemblage of subtropical Brazil

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Cited by 13 publications
(7 citation statements)
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“…The hypothesis of a greater temporal persistence of species at Pecém, the more tropical location, was also rejected, as persistence was greater at Ilhabela. Unfortunately, our study was too short in duration to properly evaluate interannual variability, but a two-year study at Ilhabela found a similar turnover of species between years, and patterns of species persistence held within both years encompassed by that study (Fernandez et al 2014).…”
Section: Spatial and Temporal Variation In Cnidarian Recruitmentmentioning
confidence: 87%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The hypothesis of a greater temporal persistence of species at Pecém, the more tropical location, was also rejected, as persistence was greater at Ilhabela. Unfortunately, our study was too short in duration to properly evaluate interannual variability, but a two-year study at Ilhabela found a similar turnover of species between years, and patterns of species persistence held within both years encompassed by that study (Fernandez et al 2014).…”
Section: Spatial and Temporal Variation In Cnidarian Recruitmentmentioning
confidence: 87%
“…Temporal turnover of benthic cnidarians 495 panels on which a species was observed, for each period, out of the total number of replicate panels. This measure of local population abundance (occurrence on different panels) is therefore only a proxy for the number of individuals, but previous studies at Ilhabela show it correlates well with individual-based counts on plates (Fernandez et al 2014;Marina Fernandez 2014, personal observation). We then evaluated whether temporal persistence was associated with local abundance using bivariate scatterplots and determined whether the bivariate space formed by these variables was non-random using EcoSim v. 7.71 (Gotelli & Entsminger 2012).…”
Section: Statistical Analysesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Seasonality and population dynamics of hydroid species (viz., Gili & Hughes 1995;Bavestrello et al 2006;Rossi et al 2012;Fernandez et al 2014Fernandez et al , 2015 are influenced by marine abiotic and biotic factors that, ultimately, may constitute geographic barriers for some species although not influencing the distribution of others. Temporal variation of species richness in assemblages of benthic hydroids has already been described, and two types of species in Hydrozoa have been recognized: species recruiting to new surfaces year-round, and species doing so sporadically and without strong seasonality (Migotto et al 2001;Fernandez et al 2014).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Seasonality and population dynamics of hydroid species (viz., Gili & Hughes 1995;Bavestrello et al 2006;Rossi et al 2012;Fernandez et al 2014Fernandez et al , 2015 are influenced by marine abiotic and biotic factors that, ultimately, may constitute geographic barriers for some species although not influencing the distribution of others. Temporal variation of species richness in assemblages of benthic hydroids has already been described, and two types of species in Hydrozoa have been recognized: species recruiting to new surfaces year-round, and species doing so sporadically and without strong seasonality (Migotto et al 2001;Fernandez et al 2014). Reasons for these different scenarios are not clear, but one could hypothesize that wide distributions of hydroid species may be due to the many different strategies of asexual and sexual reproduction in complex life cycles including polyp and/or medusa/medusoid stages (Gili & Hughes 1995), and their great capacity to colonize different substrates (viz., Gili & Hughes 1995;Genzano & Rodriguez 1998;Migotto et al 2001;Genzano 2002;Oliveira & Marques 2007, 2011.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Artificial substrates, such as recruitment panels, are widely used to monitor marine fouling communities, describe spatial and temporal patterns and predator effects to determine the composition of the fouling community, and detect the presence of non-native species (e.g. Nydam & Stachowicz, 2007;Broitman et al, 2008;Bumbeer & Rocha, 2012;Fernandez et al, 2014;García-Sanz et al, 2014).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%