2013
DOI: 10.1021/jf402400v
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Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods during Cooking

Abstract: Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking tim… Show more

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Cited by 90 publications
(71 citation statements)
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“…On the contrary, median Ni/PM 10 mass ratios for outdoor and cooking microenvironments were equal to 141 and 145 ppm for Southern and 136 and 142 ppm for Northern Italy, respectively. The higher ratios measured for cooking were likely due to the direct emission of Ni from food preparation activities (Kamerud et al, 2013). Table 4 presents the ELCR for an entire lifetime obtained on the basis of the exposure to B[a]p, As, Cd and Ni, both for Northern and Southern Italy.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…On the contrary, median Ni/PM 10 mass ratios for outdoor and cooking microenvironments were equal to 141 and 145 ppm for Southern and 136 and 142 ppm for Northern Italy, respectively. The higher ratios measured for cooking were likely due to the direct emission of Ni from food preparation activities (Kamerud et al, 2013). Table 4 presents the ELCR for an entire lifetime obtained on the basis of the exposure to B[a]p, As, Cd and Ni, both for Northern and Southern Italy.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The conflict between food and bioenergy can be avoided by converting non-edible greases (e.g., waste cooking oil, WCO) into biofuels, and is presently feasible. However, some poor-quality aluminum, copper or stainless cooking utensils with may result in the presence of toxic metallic elements (Ni, Cr, Fe) (Kamerud et al, 2013;Bassioni et al, 2015) in the recycled WCO. According to Health Canada, cooking a meal in an aluminium pan can add about 1-2 mg aluminium (the WHO acceptable daily intake is 50 mg day -1 ) to food (Diamond, 2005).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The chances of exposure to Cr 6+ in everyday life are gradually increasing. Industrial production, medical materials, and environmental pollution, along with materials that we are exposed to in daily life, such as joint replacements [28], porcelain teeth [29], stainless steel cookware [30], or even groundwater pollution [31], all increase the risk of Cr 6+ exposure. Although we have long realized that RBCs have a special affinity for Cr 6+ [32], studies focusing on Cr 6+ -toxicity in RBCs are scarce.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%