2015
DOI: 10.1126/science.aad0843
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Stable recombination hotspots in birds

Abstract: The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species, the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata and the long-tailed finch Poephila acuticauda. We find that both species have hotspots, which are enriched near functi… Show more

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Cited by 289 publications
(380 citation statements)
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References 95 publications
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“…At the whole-genome level, similar results were found with 2/3 of COs overlapping genes, as this is the case for most COs in plants (reviewed in Mercier et al 2015). Our COs were found in the gene body and slightly more frequently in promoters and terminators, confirming the results observed in Arabidopsis (Choi et al 2013) as well as in avian (Singhal et al 2015;Smeds et al 2016) and in Saccharomyces species (Lam and Keeney 2015), where recombination pattern is highly conserved and localized to the promoter (TSS) and terminator (TTS) regions.…”
Section: Retrotransposons Associate With Reduced Recombination Ratesupporting
confidence: 79%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…At the whole-genome level, similar results were found with 2/3 of COs overlapping genes, as this is the case for most COs in plants (reviewed in Mercier et al 2015). Our COs were found in the gene body and slightly more frequently in promoters and terminators, confirming the results observed in Arabidopsis (Choi et al 2013) as well as in avian (Singhal et al 2015;Smeds et al 2016) and in Saccharomyces species (Lam and Keeney 2015), where recombination pattern is highly conserved and localized to the promoter (TSS) and terminator (TTS) regions.…”
Section: Retrotransposons Associate With Reduced Recombination Ratesupporting
confidence: 79%
“…In avian (Singhal et al 2015;Smeds et al 2016) and in Saccharomyces species (Lam and Keeney 2015), recombination patterns are highly conserved during evolution. This led us to assay using another approach to reveal historical recombination using LD and coalescent theory (r-map) (Li and Stephens 2003;Crawford et al 2004) in wheat.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…increased by a factor of 1.79, 1.81 and 1.93, respectively. Within birds, such a highly nonuniform distribution of recombination events has been observed only in zebra finches and long-tailed finches so far (Singhal et al, 2015), yet it should be noted that even more extreme examples of a skewed distribution of recombination can be found in other organisms (for example, corn (Zea mays); Gore et al, 2009). In the following, we will discuss the effect of this nonuniform distribution of crossovers on precision and bias of Pedigree and Marker F.…”
Section: Mendelian Noise In Gwibdmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There are at least two types of hotspots ( figure 3). The first type, probably ancestral, is found in fungi, plants, birds and some mammals; these hotspots are temporally stable (up to millions of years) and concentrated near promoter regions and transcription start sites [178,[182][183][184][185]. The second type is likely derived and is found in other mammals, including mice and humans, where the positioning of hotspots is determined by the zinc-finger protein PRDM9.…”
Section: (D) the Localization Of Crossovers And Recombination Hotspotsmentioning
confidence: 99%