2016
DOI: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2016.06.016
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Spinal sagittal balance status affects postoperative actual falls and quality of life after decompression and fusion in-situ surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

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Cited by 15 publications
(21 citation statements)
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“…Indeed, poor postoperative spinal sagittal alignment is related to body imbalance, which may account for the association between poor spinal sagittal alignment and falls. 28 29 In this study, we included patients who underwent posterolateral fusion surgery along with decompressive surgery for LSS. These patients were set as the control group against the LLIF group, as PLF alone does not change the SB-related parameters postoperatively.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Indeed, poor postoperative spinal sagittal alignment is related to body imbalance, which may account for the association between poor spinal sagittal alignment and falls. 28 29 In this study, we included patients who underwent posterolateral fusion surgery along with decompressive surgery for LSS. These patients were set as the control group against the LLIF group, as PLF alone does not change the SB-related parameters postoperatively.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These patients were set as the control group against the LLIF group, as PLF alone does not change the SB-related parameters postoperatively. 29 …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The reasons for the same improvement in quality of life in both groups are still unclear, and the mild-to-moderate sagittal imbalance may be one of the reasons [ 18 ]. Compared with coronal imbalance, sagittal imbalance had a greater impact on the quality of life of patients; and when SVA was >6 cm, the ODI was significantly higher [ 19 , 20 ]. However, the average preoperative SVA was 54.18 mm in patients with Cobb angle 20°~40°, and then decreased to 27.27 mm at the final follow-up.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[ 17 ] Furthermore, a good spinal sagittal alignment reduces the risk of falling, and positive sagittal balance is a radiographic parameter that is most highly correlated with adverse health outcomes. [ 18 ] Poor spinal sagittal alignment is related to body imbalance and altered vision field. When the body trunk bends forward, the direction of the vision line goes downward, impairing the ability to quickly grasp circumstances and possibly causing loss of balance, leading to falls.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%