2014
DOI: 10.1111/jav.00447
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Abstract: Acoustic signals among newly diverged taxa have the potential to convey species identity, information that is key to reducing hybridization. Capuchino seedeaters constitute a remarkable example of recently radiated endemic species from the grasslands of South America. They are sexually dimorphic and show striking differences in male plumage coloration and song. Contrasting with this divergence in phenotype most species show extremely low neutral genetic differentiation and lack of reciprocal monophyly, which i… Show more

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Cited by 22 publications
(23 citation statements)
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“…This group shows remarkably high plumage colour divergence among males, which also produce distinctive vocalizations, suggesting that species-level designations to them are correct (Campagna et al 2012a). There is also evidence that males from these species react more strongly to male conspecific vocalizations than to hetero-specific ones, indicating that the interspecific differences in vocalizations are in fact detected by the birds, supporting the notion that these are different species (Benites et al 2015). The first DNA barcode study to include six of these species (among others from Argentina) showed that this was one of the very few cases with low or null interspecific differentiation in COI.…”
Section: Study Cases Where Dna Barcodes Do Not Match Taxonomymentioning
confidence: 82%
“…This group shows remarkably high plumage colour divergence among males, which also produce distinctive vocalizations, suggesting that species-level designations to them are correct (Campagna et al 2012a). There is also evidence that males from these species react more strongly to male conspecific vocalizations than to hetero-specific ones, indicating that the interspecific differences in vocalizations are in fact detected by the birds, supporting the notion that these are different species (Benites et al 2015). The first DNA barcode study to include six of these species (among others from Argentina) showed that this was one of the very few cases with low or null interspecific differentiation in COI.…”
Section: Study Cases Where Dna Barcodes Do Not Match Taxonomymentioning
confidence: 82%
“…; Benites et al . ), they may not have yet accumulated differences in neutral markers. This lack of neutral differentiation may be a product of their recent origin and large ancestral effective population size (incomplete lineage sorting) and perhaps high levels of gene flow (although we do not find evidence of this, see below).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Playback experiments suggest male southern capuchinos are able to distinguish conspecific from heterospecific vocalizations, responding aggressively only to conspecifics (Benites et al . ). Southern capuchinos are sexually dimorphic: females are phenotypically similar among different species (mostly brown and olive), yet show some cryptic (to the human eye) plumage differences in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum that birds are capable of seeing (Benites et al .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
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“…Such studies can offer important insights into possible premating barriers, at least those based on vocalizations, even for allopatric groups. Although a finding of little or no response to song playback can be indicative of reproductive barriers (e.g., Benites et al 2014), equally aggressive responses are generally inconclusive (McKitrick and Zink 1988). In general, however, there has not been a broad application of playback studies, particularly between allopatric groups.…”
Section: Literature Citedmentioning
confidence: 94%