2010
DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.2590.1.1
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Some anthoathecate hydroids and limnopolyps (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) from the Hawaiian archipelago

Abstract: A systematic account is given of 17 families, 25 genera, and 32 species of anthoathecate hydroids and limnopolyps reported from Hawaii. Applying Reversal of Precedence provisions in zoological nomenclature, the familiar hydrozoan genus names Hydractinia Van Beneden, 1844a, Bimeria Wright, 1859a, and Porpita Lamarck, 1801 are designated as valid and as nomena protecta, while seldom-used older names threatening them (the synonyms Echinochorium Hassall, 1841 and Manicella Allman, 1859a, and the homonym Porpita So… Show more

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Cited by 38 publications
(45 citation statements)
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References 178 publications
(364 reference statements)
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“…The morphology of Similiclava conforms in many respects with diagnoses of the hydrozoan family Hydractiniidae L. Agassiz, 1862(Bouillon et al 2006Schuchert Journal of Natural History 3 2008;Calder 2010), and the hydroid examined here was initially thought to be a hydractiniid. Colonies are stolonal, with hydranths arising from a creeping hydrorhiza that is enveloped in perisarc.…”
Section: Remarkssupporting
confidence: 69%
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“…The morphology of Similiclava conforms in many respects with diagnoses of the hydrozoan family Hydractiniidae L. Agassiz, 1862(Bouillon et al 2006Schuchert Journal of Natural History 3 2008;Calder 2010), and the hydroid examined here was initially thought to be a hydractiniid. Colonies are stolonal, with hydranths arising from a creeping hydrorhiza that is enveloped in perisarc.…”
Section: Remarkssupporting
confidence: 69%
“…Unlike in Clava, the tentacles are arranged in two close whorls (these appearing to comprise a single whorl in contracted hydranths) rather than being scattered over the distal end of the hydranth, and the hypostome is dome-shaped rather than being proboscidiform. It differs most immediately from the widely overlooked Hydrodendrium Nutting, 1905, another monomorphic hydractiniid genus (Calder 2010), in lacking a massive, spongy, arborescent hydrocaulus. Colonies of Similiclava differ from those of the more widely known hydractiniid genera Hydractinia Van Beneden, 1844, Podocoryna M. Sars, 1846, Clavactinia Thornely, 1904, Hydrissa Stechow, 1921a, Stylactaria Stechow, 1921a, Hydrocorella Stechow, 1921b, Janaria Stechow, 1921b, Bouillonactinia Miglietta et al 2010, and Schuchertinia Miglietta et al 2010 in being monomorphic rather than polymorphic, in lacking hydrorhizal spines and in having numerous small gonophores (as sporosacs) that are borne on normal hydranths.…”
Section: Remarksmentioning
confidence: 80%
“…Because of the prominent environmental heterogeneity between marine and estuarine ecosystems, it is therefore unlikely that P. porpita can be found in areas other than the St. Martin's island. However, the species is distributed in various parts of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific Oceans, and the Mediterranean Sea (Zhang 1999;Bouillon et al 2004;Fisner et al 2008;Calder 2010). According to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), there are 64 geo-referenced occurrence data for Porpita, globally (Fig.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The group includes not only the well-known 'by-the-wind-sailor' Velella velella but also Porpita porpita, which is commonly known as the 'blue button'. P. porpita is a colony of hydroids belonging to the family Porpitidae (Calder 2010;Gul and Gravili 2014) and primarily inhabits the ocean surface, although habitats of larvae and medusae may extend to a depth of about 200 m. Being a dweller of the uppermost layer of the marine environment, the species is easily carried to shore primarily by water currents and wind (Pandya et al 2013). It maintains flotation by means of a disc-like chitinous float, the pneumatophore, derived from the perisarc surrounded by soft living tissue.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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