2004
DOI: 10.1007/s11207-004-3747-2
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Abstract. Coronal holes (CH) emit significantly less at coronal temperatures than quiet Sun regions (QS), but can hardly be distinguished in most chromospheric and lower transition region lines. A key quantity for the understanding of this phenomenon is the magnetic field. We use data from SOHO/MDI to reconstruct the magnetic field in coronal holes and the quiet Sun with the help of a potential magnetic model. Starting from a regular grid on the solar surface we then trace field lines, which provide the overal… Show more

Help me understand this report
View preprint versions

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

8
63
0

Year Published

2007
2007
2016
2016

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

0
3

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 59 publications
(71 citation statements)
references
References 38 publications
(71 reference statements)
8
63
0
Order By: Relevance
“…In CH, no such features can be observed, suggesting that, at the layers of TR in a CH, there are basically only open field lines and almost no loops. This result is also consistent with the findings of Wiegelmann and Solanki (2004); Tian et al (2008b) that loops reside only at very low layers in a CH. The difference in magnetic morphology in higher layers is likely responsible for the different propagation of the network jets in the two regions, leading to higher speed and longer distance in CHs.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 93%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In CH, no such features can be observed, suggesting that, at the layers of TR in a CH, there are basically only open field lines and almost no loops. This result is also consistent with the findings of Wiegelmann and Solanki (2004); Tian et al (2008b) that loops reside only at very low layers in a CH. The difference in magnetic morphology in higher layers is likely responsible for the different propagation of the network jets in the two regions, leading to higher speed and longer distance in CHs.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 93%
“…In coronal images, CHs appear dark in comparison to QS because they emit less in ultraviolet and X-rays and are maintained at a lower temperature than the surrounding QS region. The different magnetic structures of CH and QS at coronal heights are responsible for their different appearance in coronal lines (Wiegelmann and Solanki, 2004;Tian et al, 2008b). CHs are dominated by open magnetic field lines expanding super-radially in the heliosphere, whereas QS regions are dominated by closed magnetic loops of different sizes.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nevertheless, it already became clear that the photospheric field in which CHs are rooted is dominated by fields of a single polarity, i.e., either positive or negative. In ECHs, for instance, the main polarity of the holes dominated in the range of 58 to 95 % and, on average, 77 ± 14 % (Wiegelmann and Solanki 2004). Equatorial quiet-Sun regions were approximately flux balanced in the range of 2 to 29 % and, on average, 9 ± 9 %.…”
Section: Properties Of Photospheric Fields Associated With Coronal Holesmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…To our knowledge, a first review on observations of CHs and the underlying solar magnetic field was presented by Harvey and Sheeley (1979). Somewhat larger CH-averaged values, rang-ing from 0.8 to 17 G, with an average value of nearly 8 G, were found by Wiegelmann and Solanki (2004). Conclusions on the magnetic structure of CHs were at that time mainly based on the photospheric LOS magnetic field observations (e.g., from KPNO).…”
Section: Properties Of Photospheric Fields Associated With Coronal Holesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…7 showing the coronal holes observed by EIT in Fe XII on the same day). This behaviour of the transition-region emission has been explained with MDI magnetograms and magnetic-field extrapolations as being caused by the difference in the loop geometry: whereas loops are present in both regions, the loops in coronal holes are generally lower than those in quiet regions, and the high loops are entirely lacking in coronal holes (Wiegelmann and Solanki 2004). Similar conclusions were reached in the paper by on the magnetic structure of the solar transition region as observed in various ultraviolet lines emitted at different temperatures.…”
Section: The Spatial Structurementioning
confidence: 95%