2022
DOI: 10.3389/fnut.2022.828522
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Sex and Species Differences in the Development of Diet-Induced Obesity and Metabolic Disturbances in Rodents

Abstract: Prevalence and health consequences of obesity differ between men and women. Yet, most preclinical studies investigating the etiology of obesity have, to date, been conducted in male rodents. Notably, diet is a major determinant of obesity, but sex differences in rodent models of diet-induced obesity, and the mechanisms that underlie such differences, are still understudied. Here, we aim to determine whether time course and characteristics of diet-induced obesity differ between sexes in rats and mice, and to in… Show more

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Cited by 76 publications
(65 citation statements)
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References 58 publications
(72 reference statements)
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“…To accomplish this, C57BL/6J mice were given ad libitum access to either low fat (LF; 10% kcal fat) or high fat diet (HD; 60% kcal fat) for 6 weeks to induce diet-induced obesity (DIO) or not in the HD or LD groups, respectively. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increase in body weight in HF-maintained animals soon upon diet onset (e.g., (Williams et al, 2011; Honors et al, 2012; Salinero et al, 2018; Maric et al, 2022)). There was a significant main effect of diet, time on diet, and an interaction between diet x time on change in body weight (two-way ANOVA, diet: F(1,33)=30.06, p<0.0001; time: F(1.751,57.80)=66.73, p<0.0001; interaction: F(5,165)=26.99, p<0.0001; Fig 5A ).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 92%
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“…To accomplish this, C57BL/6J mice were given ad libitum access to either low fat (LF; 10% kcal fat) or high fat diet (HD; 60% kcal fat) for 6 weeks to induce diet-induced obesity (DIO) or not in the HD or LD groups, respectively. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increase in body weight in HF-maintained animals soon upon diet onset (e.g., (Williams et al, 2011; Honors et al, 2012; Salinero et al, 2018; Maric et al, 2022)). There was a significant main effect of diet, time on diet, and an interaction between diet x time on change in body weight (two-way ANOVA, diet: F(1,33)=30.06, p<0.0001; time: F(1.751,57.80)=66.73, p<0.0001; interaction: F(5,165)=26.99, p<0.0001; Fig 5A ).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 92%
“…To accomplish this, C57BL/6J mice were given ad libitum access to either low fat (LF; 10% kcal fat) or high fat diet (HD; 60% kcal fat) for 6 weeks to induce diet-induced obesity (DIO) or not in the HD or LD groups, respectively. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increase in body weight in HF-maintained animals soon upon diet onset (e.g., (Williams et al, 2011;Honors et al, 2012;Salinero et al, 2018;Maric et al, 2022)). There was a significant (Hwang et al, 2010;Carlin et al, 2016;Salinero et al, 2018;Maric et al, 2022), we observed a robust sex-difference in DIO expression, wherein females exhibited less weight gain as compared to males when maintained on the same HF diet…”
Section: Effect Of Gc Glp-1r Agonism On Palatable Food Intake In Obes...supporting
confidence: 92%
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“…In the present study, we have shown that both HCD and AtDCS can affect feeding behavior, metabolic parameters as well as main phyla of the gut microbiota of female Wistar rats. Because sex and species differences in the development of diet-induced obesity and metabolic disturbances in rodents were described [70], we aimed at investigating if our feeding and stimulation protocols [50,51,69] were effective regardless of gender. It was shown [70] that diet-induced hyperphagia is greater in males offered a high-fat diet, irrespective of species, and female rats show a delay in diet-induced obesity and metabolic complications due to higher energy expenditure and lower level of hyperphagia.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Because sex and species differences in the development of diet-induced obesity and metabolic disturbances in rodents were described [70], we aimed at investigating if our feeding and stimulation protocols [50,51,69] were effective regardless of gender. It was shown [70] that diet-induced hyperphagia is greater in males offered a high-fat diet, irrespective of species, and female rats show a delay in diet-induced obesity and metabolic complications due to higher energy expenditure and lower level of hyperphagia. Furthermore, obese female and male rodents obtained a dramatic adiposity and glucose intolerance, probably due to a decreased energy expenditure and to higher intake of saturated fats compared to the lean controls.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%