2021
DOI: 10.3389/fendo.2021.675643
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Abstract: BackgroundBilateral lesions are common in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). For patients with unilateral PTC, occult carcinoma that is not detected preoperatively, but pathologically after surgery, might remain in the contralateral lobe. In this situation, inadequate surgical extent could cause relapse and even lead to re-operation. Here, we explore the frequency and investigate the risk factors of contralateral occult PTC in unilateral PTC through a retrospective study conducted by our team and published art… Show more

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Cited by 14 publications
(19 citation statements)
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“…Previous studies showed that encapsulation was correlated with multifocality and CNM [ 16 , 33 , 34 ]; therefore, we established a linear regression model based on these three variables to eliminate collinearity (VIF = 1.006 and 1.009, respectively). Furthermore, there were also studies [ 14 , 25 , 27 ] , showing that capsular invasion was related to COPTC, which is contrary to our conclusion. That is interesting because some scholars defined multifocality as PTC with intrathyroidal extension with a hypothesis considering that the multiple foci result from a single primary lesion via intrathyroidal lymphatics [ 15 ].…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Previous studies showed that encapsulation was correlated with multifocality and CNM [ 16 , 33 , 34 ]; therefore, we established a linear regression model based on these three variables to eliminate collinearity (VIF = 1.006 and 1.009, respectively). Furthermore, there were also studies [ 14 , 25 , 27 ] , showing that capsular invasion was related to COPTC, which is contrary to our conclusion. That is interesting because some scholars defined multifocality as PTC with intrathyroidal extension with a hypothesis considering that the multiple foci result from a single primary lesion via intrathyroidal lymphatics [ 15 ].…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 99%
“…In our study, the incidence of contralateral occult thyroid cancer is 20.1%. We found that multifocality of the ipsilateral lobe was an independent risk factor of the presence of COPTC in unilateral clinical PTC, meeting the same conclusion from some studies [25][26][27][28]. However, dissimilar to several previous studies [14,26], we excluded all the patients with contralateral nodules indicated by preoperative ultrasound, even those with TI-RADS < 3, for the reason of the limitation of the US to differentiate malignancies from benign nodules [29], which may lead to bias, and patients with occult contralateral benign nodules confirmed by postoperative pathology were assigned to control group.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 89%
“…Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was identified as a negatively predictive factor by multivariate logistic analysis. Tumor size is a critical factor estimated for the biological features of PTC, because tumor size can be readily obtained by preoperative US examination [ 32 ]. Malignant-looking PTC was more prevalence with extrathyroidal extension, cervical CLNM, and advanced stage than benign-looking PTC, especially when tumor diameter more than 10 mm [ 33 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Effective risk stratification based on the evaluation of clinicopathological risk features is important for appropriate treatment of DTC patients to balance treatment, such as surgical benefits and complications ( 6 , 7 ). This can be referenced in the American Thyroid Association’s guidelines (6th, 7th, and 8th versions) on the management of DTC ( 5 , 8 , 9 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%