2009
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.031484
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Resolution and sensitivity of the eyes of the Asian honeybees Apis florea, Apis cerana and Apis dorsata

Abstract: SUMMARYBees of the genus Apis are important foragers of nectar and pollen resources. Although the European honeybee, Apis mellifera, has been well studied with respect to its sensory abilities, learning behaviour and role as pollinators, much less is known about the other Apis species. We studied the anatomical spatial resolution and absolute sensitivity of the eyes of three sympatric species of Asian honeybees, Apis cerana, Apis florea and Apis dorsata and compared them with the eyes of A. mellifera. Of these… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1
1

Citation Types

7
64
2
1

Year Published

2010
2010
2016
2016

Publication Types

Select...
6
3

Relationship

1
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 50 publications
(74 citation statements)
references
References 43 publications
7
64
2
1
Order By: Relevance
“…An optical sensitivity similar to that found in V. crabro (0.14 µm 2 sr) is found in diurnal bees ( Apis mellifera , 0.1), in humans (0.1; for review see [24]), and also in two large bee species that are normally diurnal but are able to forage on moonlit nights: A. dorsata , the Asian giant honeybee [8], and X. tenuiscapa , a large Indian carpenter bee [7]. Both species also have narrow rhabdoms and small acceptance angles, similar to V. crabro , and while interommatidial angles are not known for A. dorsata , those of X. tenuiscapa are as small as those of V. crabro [7].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 63%
“…An optical sensitivity similar to that found in V. crabro (0.14 µm 2 sr) is found in diurnal bees ( Apis mellifera , 0.1), in humans (0.1; for review see [24]), and also in two large bee species that are normally diurnal but are able to forage on moonlit nights: A. dorsata , the Asian giant honeybee [8], and X. tenuiscapa , a large Indian carpenter bee [7]. Both species also have narrow rhabdoms and small acceptance angles, similar to V. crabro , and while interommatidial angles are not known for A. dorsata , those of X. tenuiscapa are as small as those of V. crabro [7].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 63%
“…Yet, there is only limited understanding of the impact that light pollution has on the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Many organisms have evolved to take advantage of natural light regimes in terms of intensity [3,4], periodicity [5,6] and spectral characteristics [7,8]. Artificially illuminating the nocturnal environment changes the predictability of these regimes, potentially affecting foraging, navigation, communication and the regulation of daily and seasonal cycles in a plethora of species [9,10].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…ants [21], [22], bees [13], [17][19], [23], [24] and wasps [25]) document the relation between the structure of the visual system and the specific light environment in which the animal is active. In a recent study, Somanathan et al [24] document visual adaptations of honeybee workers in three Asian species and the Western honeybee and discuss the implications of the eye design in the context of photic niche utilization for foraging. Temporal niche partitioning in honeybees is further important in the context of mating.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%