2018
DOI: 10.1590/1516-4446-2017-2365 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Objective: Few quantitative studies have examined the effect of religious involvement on the course of bipolar disorder (BD). We investigated the effects of religious activity and coping behaviors on the course of depression, mania, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with BD. Methods: Two-year longitudinal study of 168 outpatients with BD. Linear regression was used to examine associations between religious predictors and outcome variables (manic symptoms, depression, QoL), controlling for sociodemographic … Show more

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“…Likewise, in a 14-year follow-up of 89 708 women in the Nurses' Health Study, VanderWeele et al (2016b) found that frequent religious attendance in 1996 predicted a lower risk of completed suicide by 2010, independent of multiple risk factors (HR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.06–0.46), with more than a fivefold reduction in suicide incidence, from 7 per 100 000 to 1 per 100 000 person-years. The results, if extrapolated to the entire US population, would indicate that approximately 40% of the increase in the US suicide rate between 1999 and 2014 could be attributed to the decline in weekly religious attendance during that period (VanderWeele 2017).…”
Section: Negative Mental Healthmentioning
“…Although several cross-sectional studies have examined this relationship, reporting no association, fewer episodes and more episodes, we are aware of only one prospective study. Stroppa et al (2018) followed 158 Brazilian out-patients with bipolar disorder from 2011 (baseline) to 2013 (follow-up), examining the effect of baseline religiosity and religious coping (positive and negative) on symptoms of mania, depression and quality of life (QOL) at follow-up. Positive religious coping and religiosity were both associated with lower depression scores at baseline.…”
Section: Negative Mental Healthmentioning
“…As against the finding of Harada et al (2008) who identified higher depressive symptoms among males than females, Li et al (2015) in a five-year study found higher depressive rate among women than men affiliated with different religious practices. Women have been found to actively engage in more religious practices than men with the varied implication of religiosity on general mental health (Stroppa et al, 2018). Until now, studies on religiosity and depressive symptomology have focused on individuals without deafness although reports of those finding have largely been inconsistent.…”
Section: Studies Ofmentioning
“…Studies that examine the relation between religiousness and BD in particular, are scarce, heterogeneous in design, and show mixed results. They usually investigate relations between religious variables and symptoms of BD (Azorin et al 2013;Huguelet et al 2016;Stroppa and Moreira Almeida 2013;Stroppa et al 2018), measures of well-being or quality of life (Huguelet et al 2016;Stroppa and Moreira Almeida 2013;Stroppa et al 2018), or measures of resilience (Mizuno et al 2018). The current study is focused not on the relation between health outcomes and religious variables in BD but on explanations of particular experiences related to this illness, namely, on experiences that patients perceive as religious or spiritual.…”
Section: Religion and Serious Mental Illnessmentioning
“…In the last 20 years, a consistent body of research has demonstrated that, although some negative religious/spiritual beliefs may have a harmful effect on health [ 9 , 10 ], in the majority of cases, religious involvement is associated with positive outcomes in terms of physical health and, principally, mental health [ 11 , 12 ]. Studies have noted that R/S is associated with a better quality of life [ 13 ], lower rates of substance abuse [ 14 ], anxiety [ 15 , 16 ], suicide [ 17 , 18 ], depression [ 19 , 20 ] and various other health benefits in general [ 8 , 21 ] for example it may foster feelings of meaningfulness and peace of mind [ 22 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning