2014
DOI: 10.1097/acm.0000000000000427
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Reframing Medical Education to Support Professional Identity Formation

Abstract: Teaching medical professionalism is a fundamental component of medical education. The objective is to ensure that students understand the nature of professionalism and its obligations and internalize the value system of the medical profession. The recent emergence of interest in the medical literature on professional identity formation gives reason to reexamine this objective. The unstated aim of teaching professionalism has been to ensure the development of practitioners who possess a professional identity. T… Show more

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Cited by 631 publications
(534 citation statements)
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References 27 publications
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“…Nevertheless, especially in a work-life context, interest has been on merely stress buffering. In the context of medical workplace learning, however, both identity and relational functions are important, because they work toward the objectives of specialization training, toward professional identity formation [32]. Every senior is an important role model in the identity formation process [36], and it is extremely important to be aware that every professional encounter may reinforce or hinder the process of professional identity formation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Nevertheless, especially in a work-life context, interest has been on merely stress buffering. In the context of medical workplace learning, however, both identity and relational functions are important, because they work toward the objectives of specialization training, toward professional identity formation [32]. Every senior is an important role model in the identity formation process [36], and it is extremely important to be aware that every professional encounter may reinforce or hinder the process of professional identity formation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Professional identity can be seen as a representation of one’s self, which is formed over time in stages through an internalization of the norms, values, and characteristics of one’s medical profession [32]. Professional medical identity is dynamic, and it changes throughout one’s life and career [33].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As facilitators, we would focus on this student's professional development and socialization into the profession while maintaining her core ethical values [8,9]. She is idealistic and wishes to serve the indigent.…”
Section: Teaching a Critical Incident Narrativementioning
confidence: 99%
“…In ethics as well as other aspects of medicine, the practitioner considers if outcomes are optimal and, if not, what might have been done better. In this way, moral development progresses alongside professional identity formation as a lifelong process [8][9][10]. We will begin this paper with a case illustrating how ethics can be learned and then taught through reflection-inaction and reflection-on-action.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Like any other professional programme of learning, theory and practice cannot exist as non-related parts, as the sense of becoming can only be achieved by the merging and integration of both parts. The role of academic teams is to require the student not just to think, but act and feel like a professional during this learning (Dall'Alba 2009, Cruess et al 2014. It begins on the first day of their programme and is embedded throughout all learning, presented as a journey towards the goal of supporting students to graduate and transition to become the professional self.…”
Section: Putting It Into Practicementioning
confidence: 99%