2016
DOI: 10.3758/s13423-016-1010-0
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Abstract: Francis (Psychonomic Bulletin Review, 21, 1180-1187, 2014 recently claimed that 82 % of articles with four or more experiments published in Psychological Science between 2009 and 2012 cannot be trusted. We critique Francis' analysis and point out the dependence of his approach on including the appropriate experiments and significance tests.

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Cited by 4 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…To satisfy this requirement, only a single test from Experiment 1 could be part of the p-curve analysis, even though the theoretical claim depended on multiple successful tests. The same problems apply to the p-curve analyses for other papers reported in Table S1 of van Boxtel and Koch (2016).…”
Section: Point 1: the Tes Analysis Does Not Require All Experiments Tmentioning
confidence: 88%
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“…To satisfy this requirement, only a single test from Experiment 1 could be part of the p-curve analysis, even though the theoretical claim depended on multiple successful tests. The same problems apply to the p-curve analyses for other papers reported in Table S1 of van Boxtel and Koch (2016).…”
Section: Point 1: the Tes Analysis Does Not Require All Experiments Tmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…Setting aside the calculation errors of success probabilities in van Boxtel and Koch (2016), their primary disagreement with the analysis in Francis (2014) concerns which tests were relevant to the theoretical claims in van Boxtel and Koch (2012). Readers will have to check the text of van Boxtel and Koch (2012) to verify that the description of the tests in Table 1 properly represents their original reasoning.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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