1991
DOI: 10.2307/3563319
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Recognizing Suffering

Abstract: Medicine and ethics alike must learn properly to attend to suffering. We can never truly experience another's distress. We can, however, learn to recognize the particular purposes, values, and aesthetic responses that shape the sense of self whose integrity is threatened by pain, disease, and the mischances of life.

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

1
81
0
1

Year Published

1997
1997
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
6
1
1

Relationship

0
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 124 publications
(83 citation statements)
references
References 0 publications
1
81
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…Ill persons undergo transformations in which they are unable to be the persons they once were. This threat to wholeness generates suffering 35 and involves the physical, social, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of personhood described in this study. 36 Suffering is an inherently unpleasant experience refl ecting perceptions of helplessness.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ill persons undergo transformations in which they are unable to be the persons they once were. This threat to wholeness generates suffering 35 and involves the physical, social, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of personhood described in this study. 36 Suffering is an inherently unpleasant experience refl ecting perceptions of helplessness.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Doing so involves (1) direct questioning, (2) appreciating the sounds and sights of suffering, (3) sensing the loss of connection with patients who have withdrawn into their suffering, and (4) empathic identifi cation. 38 The diagnosis of suffering is uniquely dependent upon the clinician's subjective experience, making physicianhealers "strange instruments." 51 To manage the shared vulnerability of the close interpersonal relationships of healing, physician-healers must be mindful so they can balance their personal responses to patients with their professional presentation.…”
Section: Back To the Futurementioning
confidence: 99%
“…1(p54) Yet, sharing vulnerability opens the possibility of a healing connection around the commonality of human woundedness. 37 The compassion that fosters a therapeutic alliance and enhances knowledge of another's suffering is aided by empathy, 38 which requires a willingness to suffer some of the patient's pain in the sharing of suffering that is vital to healing. 33,37,39,40 The empathic understanding that ensues from a strong therapeutic alliance allows physician-healers to actively and intentionally guide patients in rewriting their life narratives to affi rm normalcy, establish acceptance, discover meaning, make new connections to the world, transcend suffering, and experience healing.…”
Section: Healing Connectionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Rather, it may be understood as something of value which makes possible spiritual connection and transformation (Norris, 2009). This may lead to speculation that secular approaches to healing, such as those offered by allopathic medicine, may invalidate suffering as an important element of human existence (Cassell, 1991).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Palliative care, anaesthesia, pharmacology, psychology, and psychiatry all have as their goal the relief of suffering -be it physical, emotional, psychological or, even, existential. Historically, and in recent years, a large body of literature has concerned itself with issues relating to the management, prevention, and relief of pain and suffering (Boston, Bruce, & Schreiber, 2011;Cassell, 1991;Edwards, 2003;Egnew, 2009;Norris, 2009;van Hooft, 1998). But while the relief of suffering seems laudable, some question whether medicine can, or should, aim for a world without pain, sadness, anxiety, despair or uncertainty (Breggin, 2003;Elliott, 1998).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%