2022
DOI: 10.1089/lgbt.2021.0396
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Recognizing Racial Disparities in Postoperative Outcomes of Gender Affirming Surgery

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Cited by 6 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…Although there is consistent evidence that racial disparities in surgical outcomes resolve whenever access becomes more equitable, our finding that White patients experience significantly fewer postoperative complications compared with other races, especially Black or African American patients, continues to highlight the need for further research on the systemic factors of health disparities in gender-affirming surgery. 27,28 These differences remain after adjustment for comorbidities like diabetes, being a smoker within the past year, and hypertension requiring medication, but factors like racial gaps in medical literature and surgeon trust are difficult to measure and compound through the intersectionality of race and gender affirmation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although there is consistent evidence that racial disparities in surgical outcomes resolve whenever access becomes more equitable, our finding that White patients experience significantly fewer postoperative complications compared with other races, especially Black or African American patients, continues to highlight the need for further research on the systemic factors of health disparities in gender-affirming surgery. 27,28 These differences remain after adjustment for comorbidities like diabetes, being a smoker within the past year, and hypertension requiring medication, but factors like racial gaps in medical literature and surgeon trust are difficult to measure and compound through the intersectionality of race and gender affirmation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although our study was not powered to detect individual racial differences, differences in race bring in larger questions of surgical access and are an area for further exploration and research. A separate study of TGNB patients in the ACS NSQIP database demonstrated that race is an independent predictor of postoperative outcomes after gender-affirming surgical procedures, with Black patients having higher odds of reoperation 30 …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A separate study of TGNB patients in the ACS NSQIP database demonstrated that race is an independent predictor of postoperative outcomes after gender-affirming surgical procedures, with Black patients having higher odds of reoperation. 30 Strengths of this study include its use of a large, national database designed to track surgical outcomes. Our study should be interpreted in the context of several limitations.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%