2022
DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.859024
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Ready for Vaccination? COVID-19 Vaccination Willingness of Older People in Austria

Abstract: In spite of findings highlighting higher health risk from infection compared to younger people, a certain percentage of older people in Austria still lack a valid vaccination certificate. The current gaps in vaccination coverage in countries such as Austria are likely to be in large part due to vaccination refusal and pose or will pose problems for the health system and consequently for all of society should the initial findings on Omicron coronavirus infectivity prove true. Surprisingly, only a few studies ar… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…Although many older people had chosen to become vaccinated by summer 2021, continuing deficits were noted among the poor group. As a recent study shows, differences in Austria along financial resources persist even after controlling for education and other factors ( 53 ). A mix of factors is probably responsible for this: although vaccinations are free of charge in Austria, they are and have been accessible to varying degrees (e.g., distance to the nearest vaccination center, etc.).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Although many older people had chosen to become vaccinated by summer 2021, continuing deficits were noted among the poor group. As a recent study shows, differences in Austria along financial resources persist even after controlling for education and other factors ( 53 ). A mix of factors is probably responsible for this: although vaccinations are free of charge in Austria, they are and have been accessible to varying degrees (e.g., distance to the nearest vaccination center, etc.).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Paradoxically, this inactivity can be seen on the one hand as an advantage in the pandemic, as costly measures [such as face masks as mentioned in Portacolone et al ( 51 )] may thereby have been used slightly less often. A problematic finding in this context is, that vaccination hesitancy was significantly higher among older adults reporting problems making ends meet or at risk of poverty ( 52 , 53 ) at least in the first year of the pandemic. On the other hand reduced (social) activities may have also brought about negative effects: older people with difficulties to make ends meet had a significantly higher probability of feeling depressed ( 54 , 55 ), anxious ( 55 ) and lonely since the outbreak of the pandemic ( 54 , 56 ) and more often reported decreasing mental health ( 57 , 58 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%