2006
DOI: 10.2807/esw.11.25.02980-en
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Abstract: In 2006, a new national influenza surveillance system began reporting in the United Kingdom. QFLU is a new daily data collection

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Cited by 6 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…By the end of June 2009, the most reliable estimates of epidemic growth rate for the H1N1pdm pandemic were those obtained from the comprehensive (>25% population coverage) Qsurveillance sentinel surveillance system for influenza-like-illness operating in England [28] . Fitting an exponential model with non-zero intercept to data from the Qsurveillance network data available to July 1 [29] the estimated real-time exponential growth rate is 0.141/day (95% CI: 0.127–0.156), corresponding to a doubling time of 4.9 days (95% CI: 4.4–5.5 days).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…By the end of June 2009, the most reliable estimates of epidemic growth rate for the H1N1pdm pandemic were those obtained from the comprehensive (>25% population coverage) Qsurveillance sentinel surveillance system for influenza-like-illness operating in England [28] . Fitting an exponential model with non-zero intercept to data from the Qsurveillance network data available to July 1 [29] the estimated real-time exponential growth rate is 0.141/day (95% CI: 0.127–0.156), corresponding to a doubling time of 4.9 days (95% CI: 4.4–5.5 days).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The influenza syndromic surveillance capability of the Health Protection Agency (HPA) includes the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Weekly Returns Service 5 and the QSurveillance system (University of Nottingham and Egton Medical Information Systems Ltd), which analyse anonymised morbidity data automatically extracted from networks of participating general practices. 6 Since the beginning of the influenza A/H1N1 2009 epidemic, general practice diagnoses of influenza-like illness and a range of other respiratory tract infections (rates per 100 000 population) have been monitored on a daily (QSurveillance) and weekly basis (QSurveillance, RCGP), providing information for regular situation reports. 7 Throughout May and most of June 2009, however, general practice consultation rates for influenza-like illness remained well below the upper limit for "baseline activity" of 30 cases per 100 000 population.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…17 The primary difference is in the data used. Instead of using counts of case confirmations alone, an array of different data sets were combined: age-and region-stratified data on GP consultations for ILI; 18 virological positivity data from individuals reporting symptoms of ILI available through the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) surveillance network and the Regional Microbiology Network (RMN) of the HPA; virological case confirmations from the early part of the epidemic; and data on the seropositivity of sera samples taken before and during the 2009 pandemic and held by the Weekly Returns Service of the RCGP. The modelling details of this second approach are detailed in Modelling methodology: single region model and Appendix 1 for more details.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%