2017
DOI: 10.1186/s12879-017-2843-5
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Provider initiated tuberculosis case finding in outpatient departments of health care facilities in Ghana: yield by screening strategy and target group

Abstract: BackgroundMeticulous identification and investigation of patients presenting with tuberculosis (TB) suggestive symptoms rarely happen in crowded outpatient departments (OPDs). Making health providers in OPDs diligently follow screening procedures may help increase TB case detection. From July 2010 to December 2013, two symptom based TB screening approaches of varying cough duration were used to screen and test for TB among general outpatients, PLHIV, diabetics and contacts in Accra, Ghana.MethodsThis study was… Show more

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Cited by 19 publications
(22 citation statements)
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“…Other countries, such as India focuses on systematic screening in high-risk populations such as people living in urban slums [22]. Ohene and colleagues [23] however argue that, when considering a TB screening program, it is essential to simultaneously look at the overall health system functions and enhance capacity to facilitate early detection. Patient delay for seeking TB care may arise from various factors, including barriers in access to care such as costs of seeking care or stigma [24].…”
Section: Plos Onementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Other countries, such as India focuses on systematic screening in high-risk populations such as people living in urban slums [22]. Ohene and colleagues [23] however argue that, when considering a TB screening program, it is essential to simultaneously look at the overall health system functions and enhance capacity to facilitate early detection. Patient delay for seeking TB care may arise from various factors, including barriers in access to care such as costs of seeking care or stigma [24].…”
Section: Plos Onementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Since its launch in 2011, health systems of various countries, including Ghana, have adopted the collaborative framework and are at various stages of implementation [5]. Ghana's NTP begun the pilot phase of the Intensive Case Finding Initiative (ICF) between 2009-2013 and has since expanded it to all facilities offering TB care [11]. The objective of the pilot phase was to assess the feasibility of screening all patients who visit public health facilities for TB [11].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Prevalence of PPTB reported by other studies varied across populations, a study from India reported the prevalence to be 8%, while two others from Ghana and Cameroon reported a prevalence of 1% and 55% respectively. [6][7][8] The difference in the study setting and the operational definition of presumptive TB used in the studies may have contributed to the difference in prevalence. We used 'cough of any duration' as one of the criteria which may partially explain the higher proportion of PPTB in our study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The use of "cough of any duration" as one of the symptoms for screening can be considered a strength as studies suggest screening regardless of the duration of cough or using a shorter duration of cough (>24 hours) instead of cough >2 weeks should accelerate early detection of TB. 7 A systematic review which looked into the sensitivity and specificity of different screening tools using culture-confirmed pulmonary TB as the gold standard, found the pooled sensitivity of "any cough" to be greater than "prolonged cough (lasting >2-3 weeks)", the latter, however, had a higher specificity. 12 According to the review, although, "prolonged cough" would limit the resource needs for confirmatory tests, it would leave a majority of the TB cases undetected.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%