2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1517-83822011000300032
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Abstract: Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are biodegradable and biocompatible green thermoplastics, synthesized by wide variety of bacteria as an intracellular carbon and energy storage intermediate. They are used as an alternative to nonrenewable petroleum derived plastics. The current interest in these biopolyesters is stimulated by the search for cost-effective capitalized production. This paper attempts to achieve maximized production rate from recombinant system using inexpensive substrate. Molasses from agro-industria… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(10 citation statements)
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References 9 publications
(10 reference statements)
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“…Multiple melting peaks are a common feature of semi-crystalline polymers (Wellen et al 2015). Multi-component PHAs, as observed in the present study, which have other alkanoate components or long side chains, tend to have a lower T m (Saranya and Shenbagarathai 2011;Sandhya et al 2013). Sharma et al (2017) reported that the copolymer PHBV produced by Pseudomonas putida had a T m of 137-170 °C, which is higher than the T m of PHBV observed in the present study.…”
Section: Dsc Analysissupporting
confidence: 43%
“…Multiple melting peaks are a common feature of semi-crystalline polymers (Wellen et al 2015). Multi-component PHAs, as observed in the present study, which have other alkanoate components or long side chains, tend to have a lower T m (Saranya and Shenbagarathai 2011;Sandhya et al 2013). Sharma et al (2017) reported that the copolymer PHBV produced by Pseudomonas putida had a T m of 137-170 °C, which is higher than the T m of PHBV observed in the present study.…”
Section: Dsc Analysissupporting
confidence: 43%
“…An engineered E.coli expressing phaC1 from Pseudomonas sp. was also found to produce PHAs from molasses: 45 higher PHA yield was achieved from molasses (75% of CDM) as compared to sucrose (65% of CDM).…”
Section: Phas From Waste Glycerolmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…[326] Sinorhizobium meliloti 41 and Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava DSM 1034 can biosynthesize P(3HB), P(3HB-co-3HV) copolyesters, and P(3HB-co-3HV-co-4HB) terpolyesters from lactose. [329][330][331] Furthermore, PHAs can also be produced directly from molasses (e.g.,s ugarcane, sugar beet,a nd soy molasses), ahigh sucrose content byproduct from the sugar industry,o ro ther sucrose-rich products (e.g.,m aple sap, sugar beet juice, pineapple juice, or oil palm frondj uice) by using C. necator, [332] A. vinelandii, [331] Enterobacter species, [333] Pseudomonas corrugate, [334] A. latus, [335] recombinant E. coli, [336,337] B. subtilis, [337] B. megaterium, [338] Bacillus cereus, [339] or mixed cultures. [327] Sucrose, ad isaccharide composed of ag lucosea nd af ructose unit, is one of the most abundant and relativelyi nexpensive carbon sources extracted from sugar-bearing raw materials, such as sugar beet and sugarcane.…”
Section: Carbohydratesmentioning
confidence: 99%