2014
DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1100425
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Prevalence and Risk Factors of Child Malnutrition in Community Based Nutrition Program Implementing and Nonimplementing Districts from South East Amhara, Ethiopia

Abstract: Background: The burden of malnutrition in Ethiopia is the second highest in sub Saharan Africa. According to the recently released Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey report of 2011, the prevalence of child stunting, underweight and wasting were 44% stunted, 10% wasted and 29% underweight respectively. Objectives: To determine the magnitude and risk factors of malnutrition among 6-59 months children from Community Based Nutrition Program implementing and nonimplementing districts from south east Amhara. Me… Show more

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Cited by 17 publications
(38 citation statements)
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“…Non-exclusively breastfed children were about 2.5 times more likely to be acutely malnourished than their exclusively breastfed counter parts. This finding was in agreement with the study conducted in some parts of Ethiopia, China and Pakistan [23][24][25][26][27]. This probably due to introduction of other diets before the age of six months leads to increase chances of infection like diarrheal illness and pneumonia leading to malnutrition in these children.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 94%
“…Non-exclusively breastfed children were about 2.5 times more likely to be acutely malnourished than their exclusively breastfed counter parts. This finding was in agreement with the study conducted in some parts of Ethiopia, China and Pakistan [23][24][25][26][27]. This probably due to introduction of other diets before the age of six months leads to increase chances of infection like diarrheal illness and pneumonia leading to malnutrition in these children.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 94%
“…Different studies also elicited the predictors of wasting, according to which sub-optimal duration of exclusive breastfeeding [29, 30], poor wealth status [31] and maternal education [32], large families [33], diarrheal and respiratory tract morbidities [34, 35], unavailability of latrine [36] and rural residence [37] are associated with increased odds of wasting among children under-5 years.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite their increased and unique vulnerability, little known about the magnitude of undernutrition in this population and majority of the former local studies focused on investigating the problem among under five children [3, 17, 24, 32, 34, 36, 38]. Therefore, this study aimed to assess stunting, wasting and associated factors among children aged 6–24 months in Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site, northwest Ethiopia.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition, poor maternal education, non-working status of the mother, poor socio-economic status, and separated marital status of mother and father are independent factors associated with stunting 1215. Similarly, suboptimal breastfeeding, poor wealth status, poor maternal education, larger family size, diarrheal and respiratory tract morbidities, and unavailability of latrines are associated with increased odds of wasting among children aged under 5 years 1621…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%