2020
DOI: 10.1590/1516-4446-2019-0760
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Prevalence and risk factors for internet gaming disorder

Abstract: Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of internet gaming disorder (IGD) and associated risk factors in a sample of secondary and postsecondary students from a public federal institution of higher education (Instituto Federal de Educac¸ã o, Ciê ncia e Tecnologia) in Southern Brazil. Methods: The study included a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Self-Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-BR), the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN), and the … Show more

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Cited by 40 publications
(51 citation statements)
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“…Prevalence rates of problematic gaming varied widely in the samples ranging from 1.2 to 73.9% (weighted mean = 16.0%), while three studies had comparison groups of similar sample size ( 41 , 71 , 76 ). The majority of samples ( n = 18) were recruited from primary- / high schools, while eight samples were recruited from college/universities ( 41 , 53 – 55 , 66 , 75 , 76 , 80 ), three were recruited from gaming communities ( 24 , 52 , 74 ), one was recruited from two pediatric lipid and obesity treatment clinics ( 77 ), one was recruited through social media ( 61 ), one was recruited in “non-working contexts” [e.g., pubs, sports associations, recreational places; ( 59 )], and two samples were recruited using random population sampling ( 56 , 79 ).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Prevalence rates of problematic gaming varied widely in the samples ranging from 1.2 to 73.9% (weighted mean = 16.0%), while three studies had comparison groups of similar sample size ( 41 , 71 , 76 ). The majority of samples ( n = 18) were recruited from primary- / high schools, while eight samples were recruited from college/universities ( 41 , 53 – 55 , 66 , 75 , 76 , 80 ), three were recruited from gaming communities ( 24 , 52 , 74 ), one was recruited from two pediatric lipid and obesity treatment clinics ( 77 ), one was recruited through social media ( 61 ), one was recruited in “non-working contexts” [e.g., pubs, sports associations, recreational places; ( 59 )], and two samples were recruited using random population sampling ( 56 , 79 ).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Disordered gaming has also been linked to several negative health-related outcomes and psychosocial detriments, such as increased stress, increased obesity, decreased job performance and/or job loss, decreased academic achievement, sleep abnormalities, relationship problems, depression, lower psychosocial wellbeing, and anxiety [ 7 ] alongside other similar addictive disorders involving excessive technology use [ 17 ]. Additionally, Severo et al [ 18 ] recently found that increased depressive symptoms, poor sleeping, male gender, greater time spent gaming, and total free-time spent gaming are key IGD risk factors. In addition, other adolescent studies reported increased time spent gaming among disordered gamers [ 19 ], a phenomenon that is arguably reflected within the IGD definition itself through the operationalization of tolerance symptoms in IGD (i.e., “tolerance—the need to spend increasing amounts of time engaged gaming”) [ 2 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A recent study conducted by Moore, Satel and Pontes (in press) investigated whether disordered gaming could be predicted by health and wellbeing factors such as depression, anxiety, loneliness, attention problems, physical health problems, and psychological wellbeing in a sample of young adults and found that about 15% of the variability in GD could be explained by these predictors. In a similar vein, a recent study by Severo et al (2020) reported that IGD was associated with severe depressive symptoms, poor sleep quality, and increased time spent gaming in a sample of 555 individuals.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 71%