2007
DOI: 10.1007/s00221-007-0968-2
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Prehension is really reaching and grasping

Abstract: Prehension has traditionally been seen as the act of coordinated reaching and grasping. However, recently, Smeets and Brenner (in Motor Control 3:237-271, 1999) proposed that we might just as well look at prehension as the combination of two independently moving digits. The hand aperture that has featured prominently in many studies on prehension, according to Smeets and Brenner's "double-pointing hypothesis", is really an emergent property related to the time course of the positions of the two digits moving… Show more

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Cited by 46 publications
(46 citation statements)
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“…We defined the start of the grasping movement as the first moment at which the velocity of the index finger exceeded 0.1 m/s (a value frequently used in grasping studies; e.g., Hesse, Nakagawa, & Deubel, 2010;Schot, Brenner, & Smeets, 2010;van de Kamp & Zaal, 2007;Verheij et al, 2013). The end of the grasping movement was defined as the first moment, after the start of the movement, at which the velocity of the index finger dropped below 0.1 m/s.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We defined the start of the grasping movement as the first moment at which the velocity of the index finger exceeded 0.1 m/s (a value frequently used in grasping studies; e.g., Hesse, Nakagawa, & Deubel, 2010;Schot, Brenner, & Smeets, 2010;van de Kamp & Zaal, 2007;Verheij et al, 2013). The end of the grasping movement was defined as the first moment, after the start of the movement, at which the velocity of the index finger dropped below 0.1 m/s.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1,2,4,5 The kinematics of normal human prehensile movements have been extensively studied since Jeannerod. [6][7][8][9] Indeed, healthy individuals exhibit two prehension components: a reaching phase involving the shoulder, elbow and wrist, and a grasping phase requiring both active finger closure and the opposition of the thumb with the other fingers. 6 These two phases of healthy human prehensile movements are coupled, [6][7][8][9] as shown by the fact that the maximal grip aperture occurs at the moment of peak deceleration, 6 which itself occurs at a fixed time, 60-70% of the reaching phase.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[6][7][8][9] Indeed, healthy individuals exhibit two prehension components: a reaching phase involving the shoulder, elbow and wrist, and a grasping phase requiring both active finger closure and the opposition of the thumb with the other fingers. 6 These two phases of healthy human prehensile movements are coupled, [6][7][8][9] as shown by the fact that the maximal grip aperture occurs at the moment of peak deceleration, 6 which itself occurs at a fixed time, 60-70% of the reaching phase. 7 Reach-to-grasp movements in individuals with C6 quadriplegia show a series of important kinematics differences compared with healthy control participants.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Often the terms grasping and prehension are used interchangeably [17]. For others, prehension is the coordinated act of reaching for an object and grasping it [29]. Kang and Ikeuchi state that a grasping task is composed of pre-grasp phase, static grasp phase, and manipulation phase [13].…”
Section: Definitionsmentioning
confidence: 99%